Category Archives: Can a civilization commit suicide?

Rex Murphy: “Trudeau’s desire for global praise comes at the price of Canadian jobs, and Canadian unity”

This Cornish Rex cat is not related to or affiliated with Rex Murphy in any way.

 

In its zeal to be seen as champion for a problem we have minimal capacity to cure, this government has roiled the Canadian political landscape, stirred a current of rage in Alberta, set provinces bitterly at odds with each other, shattered the governing party in Ontario, placed useless taxes on an already depressed industry, and chased billions of dollars of investment money out of the country. Most grievously, it has already indicated to the world that Canada is a very inhospitable place for any projects large in scale that in any way might wander under the eyes and objections of global warming zealots, the politicians who support them, and governments that are their willing partners.

The world has indeed already taken notice that Canada doesn’t have its “act together” and Canada has already learned that it is “getting harder and harder to get its resources to world markets.” It is certainly true of the most cardinal resource of global commerce, our oil.

 

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Harper in Limelight

 

I think that Stephen Harper should retire completely from political life. No one likes an Obama, after all. It’s clear that most Canadians would rather their country completely collapse in every respect than vote for sane (if flawed) leadership.

Having said that, his presence is a nice change of pace from Butt’s mouthpiece to a man who can form sentences without the aid of cue cards:

Suddenly, Stephen Harper is turning up everywhere.

In the past couple of weeks, he’s made headlines for writing a book, telling an American audience in February he could still “easily” lead the Conservative Party and for adding his name to a full-page ad in the New York Times praising President Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the nuclear deal with Iran.

On Monday he was in Montreal to mark Israel’s 70th birthday and Tuesday he tweeted he was pleased to be back in “la Belle Province”, adding it was great to see one-time colleagues including former Conservative MPs Denis Lebel and Christian Paradis and Conservative Sen. Leo Housakos.

Harper’s re-emergence bodes well for the Liberals’ strategy to brand the Opposition as “Harper Conservatives.”

For their part, the Conservatives seem to be saying: Bring it on.

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The Canadian Voter

Oh, boy:

A new survey on the addition of an abortion-rights clause to 2018 Canada Summer Jobs applications shows Canadians are evenly divided over whether the requirement seems fair — but ultimately, a small majority support the decision to impose it anyway.

The Angus Reid Institute study shows a complicated response to the issue, with answers not neatly lining up with political parties or views on abortion. It also shows most Canadians haven’t been closely tuned in to the issue, with just 20 per cent saying they know a lot about it and 56 per cent saying this was the first time they’d even heard of it.

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Ontario’s voters of all stripes think little of carbon pricing schemes, say the results of a new poll released on Monday.

An Ipsos poll found most Ontarians consider the controversial emissions-reduction measure as little more than a tax grab — a sentiment shared by seven in 10 respondents.

While 85% of Conservative voters took a dim view of carbon taxes, the poll shows similar sentiments right across party lines — 72% NDP and 54% Liberal.

Eighty-three percent of decided Conservative voters felt carbon taxes unfairly punish commuters — feelings shared by 71% of NDP supporters and 52% of Liberals.

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Unelected Judges Want to Hide Their Deliberations

Oh, dear:

The Supreme Court of Canada has placed a 50-year embargo on judge deliberation records, and can even move to hide those deliberations forever.

According to the Globe & Mail, “The restriction took effect last June when the court and Library and Archives Canada announced it as part of an agreement to “ensure that the case files of Canada’s highest court will be preserved and accessible to future generations.” (The announcement went largely unnoticed at the time.) What the court and the archives did not say, but the agreement makes clear, is that the Supreme Court can withdraw the files at any time, and keep the documents secret forever, without providing a justification.”

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Ninety-Six Percent of Border Crossings are Through Quebec

Oui:

Quebec continues to receive the overwhelming majority of asylum seekers in Canada, with 96 per cent of illegal crossings into the country so far in 2018 happening at its border with the United States, according to recent RCMP statistics.

The rapid increase in the number is spurring calls from politicians in the province and community groups for Ottawa to change an agreement with the United States they say is encouraging people to get into Canada outside official ports of entry.

Out of 7,612 people who crossed illegally into the country during the first four months of the year, 7,307 came into Quebec — 2,479 in April alone, a 32 per cent increase from March.

Manitoba and British Columbia received the remainder, with about 150 asylum seekers each entering those provinces so far in 2018.

The Quebec government said projections suggested there could be as many as 400 crossings per day this summer, compared to 250 in 2017.

 

Also:

Andrea Horwath wants Ontario to be a sancutary province.

The NDP said those exact words in a January 31, 2017 press release titled “Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath to Premir Wynne: Declare Ontario a “Sanctuary Province.”‘

Here’s what the release said about making Ontario a “sanctuary province”:

“Ontario can and must also step up and lead. In addition, I urge you to declare Ontario to be a sanctuary province. In recent years, cities like Toronto and Hamilton have shown tremendous leadership by making local services accessible to all residents, regardless of their immigration status. Now, our province must do the same. We must guarantee that services will always be accessible to everyone in Ontario.”

 

And:

According to a Global News report based on government documents detailing how Canada deals with returning ISIS terrorists, the government works to facilitate the return of the terrorists to Canadian territory, and has laws that aren’t crafted to successfully punish those who left our country to fight for an evil enemy.

The report casts doubt on whether returning ISIS terrorists will be charged, saying of those investigations “Often, they require evidence of an individual’s activity in foreign conflict zones, or rely on information provided by partners that we are not authorized to disclose in court,” according to the documents. “The RCMP also faces challenges in collecting digital evidence, including access to encrypted communications.”

 

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Opinion: “If self-confessed ISIL killer is not held accountable, who will be?”

John Ivison is normally a water-carrier for the Liberals but he raises some interesting points here:

Abu Huzaifa al-Kanadi, his nom de guerre, talked in a disconcertingly bland North American accent about being taught how to behead people. “You had to know how to slice a head off,” he said.

He then depicted a group execution, in which he shot a middle-aged Muslim man in the back of the head. “It’s justified – you’re not going to be held accountable,” he said he told himself.

On another occasion, he took part in a community killing, stabbing a drug dealer in the heart. “The blood was warm and it sprayed everywhere,” he said. “I had to stab him multiple times.” 

He said the second killing left him feeling “disgusted” and determined to return to his parents in Canada. He escaped to Turkey, and then on to his grandparents’ home in Pakistan. He eventually made his way home to Canada, telling immigration authorities at the airport that he’d spent the past 10 months at university in Pakistan. “I said it in a way so that it didn’t seem I was lying,” he said.

The only positive in all this is that he said he would never return to a life of violence. “No, I’ve come too far from it,” he said.

But, regardless of his conversion to a more harmonious world-view, it should not be overlooked that there is a self-confessed killer on the loose in Canada’s biggest city – one who lied to immigration officials to get into the country. …

The Charter changes everything in Canada. British defence secretary Gavin Williamson sparked a debate in the U.K. after he said a “dead terrorist can’t cause any harm to Britain”. Opinion polls suggested that 35 per cent of Britons felt jihadis should be treated as enemy combatants, making them legitimate targets, 42 per cent favoured stripping them of citizenship and only 11 per cent said they should be brought home to face sentencing and rehabilitation.

With the first two options off the table for the Canadian government, prosecution, monitoring and rehabilitation are the only tools left in the kit.

The vast majority of Canadians favour prosecution but cautious intelligence agencies and wary prosecutors mean the Public Prosecution Service has only charged two individuals to date.

The Huzaifa case is surely an opportunity to improve that strike rate.

Contrary to his own assertion as he pulled the trigger, the law demands he is held accountable.

If the justice system won’t prosecute in such an apparent slam-dunk case, what chance convictions in more contentious litigation?

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Most Canadians can’t identify the Battle of Vimy Ridge monument: Ipsos poll

Canadians aren’t known for their patriotism, but according to a new Ipsos poll, the state of the union may be worse than we thought.

On Monday April 9, Ipsos released the results of a survey revealing that only 16 per cent of Canadians could correctly identify the Vimy Monument. The survey was released on Vimy Day, which commemorates Canada’s role in the Battle of Vimy Ridge in France during the First World War.

That’s because we’re a post-modern nation! Right Justin?

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Federal Market’s Debt Tops One Trillion Dollars

It’s just money:

The federal government’s market debt — the debt on which Ottawa pays interest — has topped $1 trillion for the first time, Department of Finance documents show.

It is a milestone, says former parliamentary budget officer Kevin Page.

The threshold, he said, highlights the urgent need for the Liberal government to have a strategy to both balance the federal books and manage the debt in an era of rising interest rates. …

Market debt is different from the federal debt and deficit figures, which are regularly presented to and debated by Canadians and reflect the federal government’s estimated total liabilities, or cash needs, and what must be borrowed from the markets.

Think of market debt as something like a mortgage — or the balance on a line of credit.

“It’s debt that generates interest,” Page said. “And Canadians will be surprised at how fast interest on the public debt is going to grow over the next five years.”

The market debt figure for 2017-18 does not reflect the cash, land or other assets the federal government has on hand.

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Article: “Canada does not engage in death squads,’ while allies actively hunt down their own foreign fighters”

… says lackey:

Stewart, a former diplomat, continued: “These are people who are executing people … who have held women and children hostage, who are torturing and murdering, trying, by violence, to impose their will. Our response has to be, when somebody does that, I’m afraid, to deal with that.”

Those words may sound chilling, but they reflect a country that’s suffered several brutal jihadi attacks in recent years, and sees jihadi returnees as a threat. Other countries have come to the same conclusion.

But Canadians who join the militant group have so far had little to fear from their own government, either at home or abroad.

The British government has co-operated with the U.S. on drone strikes that killed two of Britain’s most notorious ISIS members: Mohammed Emwazi (aka Jihadi John) and Junaid Hussain.

The Sunday Times reports that Britain’s Special Air Service, SAS, has been given a “kill list” of British jihadis, including  notorious ISIS recruiter and convert Sally Jones, and a dozen others with British university degrees in technical fields such as electronics.

Brett McGurk, former U.S. president Barack Obama’s special envoy for the fight against ISIS, who retains his post under Donald Trump, stated it explicitly on a recent visit to Syria. “Our mission is to make sure that any foreign fighter who is here, who joined ISIS from a foreign country and came into Syria, that they will die here in Syria.”

“They’re not just talking about it,” said Christian Leuprecht, an expert on terrorism and security at Royal Military College in Kingston, Ont. “Australia is another country that’s taken the same approach — that they would prefer that those individuals who’ve been identified as foreign fighters not return home.”

France, too, is working to eradicate its jihadis overseas. A Wall Street Journal investigation published in May quoted French and Iraqi officials describing French special forces co-operating with Iraqi units to hunt down and kill French jihadis.

But Canada is taking a different approach. 

“Canada does not engage in death squads,” Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale told CBC’s Power & Politics on Friday. 

“With the battlefield activity winding down, there is a very real question about where the foreign fighters go, and all of our allies, whether they’re in the Five Eyes or the G7, we’ve all agreed to collaborate very carefully.”

Goodale said anyone who poses a terrorist risk, homegrown or from elsewhere, is viewed “with the greatest of seriousness” by Canada’s intelligence, security and police agencies.

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan said his department’s job is ensuring foreign fighters don’t become a threat.

“We will make sure that we put every type of resource into place so Canadians are well protected,” he told a crowd at the Halifax International Security Forum on Friday.

These thugs don’t become a threat once they are vapourised.

But I repeat myself.

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Provincial Finances Are Much Worse Than Reported

Oh, joy:

The official balance sheets of provinces across the country mask billions of dollars in debt related to a series of megaproject follies being pursued by provincial governments and government-owned power utilities. While their debt doesn’t officially appear on provincial balance sheets, taxpayers will be left footing the bill when the electricity rates needed to pay them off become so economically crippling and politically unpalatable that they will require a bailout.

A chorus of auditors general and ratings agencies have questioned this trend of masking liabilities, but have seen their warnings ignored by political leaders determined to bury the risk of pet megaprojects.

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The Liberals Beclown Themselves in the Coal Fight

Not one of these yahoos is fit to comment on natural resources or what might replace them without destroying the economy. Unwittingly or not, they are ruining the country and people are letting them:

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wants to divert public attention away from the embarrassing reality Canada is far behind fulfilling his 2015 Paris climate accord commitments to reduce our industrial greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions linked to climate change.

That’s why Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna is declaring a “war on coal,” in conjunction with the U.K., at this week’s annual United Nations’ gabfest on climate change in Bonn, Germany.

 

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Article: “Canada to watch from the sidelines amid ‘extraordinary times’ in global energy markets”

Read the whole thing:

Two major trends are unfolding in global oil and gas markets, but Canada seems unable to take advantage of the first one, and is already an unfortunate casualty of the other, says a new report.

First, the world’s energy demand will rise the equivalent of China and India’s current energy consumption over the next three decades — but Canada has limited direct conduits to connect those energy-hungry markets to its store of the world’s third-largest oil reserves.

The second development, which has already dented the Canadian oilpatch, is the rise of U.S. tight oil and gas that is taking dollars and focus away from the Western Canadian industry.

The global energy markets are in the midst of “extraordinary times”, writes Fatih Birol, executive director at the International Energy Agency in its annual World Energy Outlook, launched in Paris on Tuesday.

The benchmark report notes that with renewable energy technologies nipping at the heels of oil, natural gas and coal and a global push by policymakers to cut carbon emissions, juxtaposed with near-insatiable demand from a global population that will hit 9 billion within a few decades and the rise of the U.S. as the world’s largest oil and gas producer, the energy sector is experiencing disruptive times.

Amid these upheavals, Canada will likely remain a minor actor, its global plans dashed partially through self-restraint and rules, and also by its next-door neighbour who is upending global markets and disrupting Canada’s plans to export oil and gas in the process.

 

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Liberals “Tax People Back Into the Stone Age” Plan Is Sending the Wealthy Out of the Country

Hey, these guys know what they’re doing:

A big Canadian player has quietly picked up his chips and is heading for the exit amid all the tumult over the Trudeau government’s controversial tax proposals.

A business owner has informed John Manley, the head of an organization representing Canada’s largest corporations, that he’s moved billions of dollars outside the country since the Liberals announced their tax changes in mid-July.

The government’s proposals to eliminate several tax incentives have awakened a large contingent of vocal opponents from numerous backgrounds — from the small business community, to farmers, to tax planners, to professionals like doctors and lawyers. Even backbench Liberal MPs have publicly expressed their concerns.

In the background, the Liberals’ proposed tax reforms are also a deep concern for a much-smaller, silent group of Canadians: wealthy business leaders.

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Tim Hortons in Vancouver Achieves Maximum Cultural Enrichment At 4:00 AM

What happens when the well mannered and considerate white people all go away?

This, and worse, but pretty much this.

The other races will battle it out for dominance and will settle upon the most racist hierarchy from your darkest nightmares.

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