FUREY: Here’s the one big misstep the current liberal order keeps making

The other day The New York Times’ resident conservative columnist David Brooks managed to sum up exactly what’s wrong with the liberal order today. He was writing about President Trump tearing up the Iran deal and the now yawn-inducing overreaction it generated from Trump’s opponents. But within Brooks’ specific observations lies the broader key to unpacking a lot of what’s so screwy in both global and domestic affairs right now.

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Horvath Will NOT Have Alcohol Sold in Corner-stores

And that is why she will lose votes:

The current system of restricted retail beer and wine sales in Ontario works well and is socially responsible, New Democrat Leader Andrea Horwath said Saturday.

Campaigning in Thunder Bay, Ont., Horwath said there’s no need to allow convenience stores to carry the products — a perennially favoured if never-implemented idea that once helped propel the Liberals to office in the mid-1980s.

“I’m going to be straight up about it: I don’t think we need to have beer and wine in the corner stores,” Horwath said. “I don’t think this is a broken system in Ontario. I don’t necessarily think that we need to mess with it. It’s working fine for people.”

The prospect of liberalized sales surfaced during the June 7 campaign when Progressive Conservative Leader Doug Ford said he would allow corner-store sales of beer and wine if he’s elected premier.

 

Granted, alcohol being sold to children is a great concern but it is also a red herring.

Teen-agers are experimenting with synthetic drugs and are using prescription drugs they’ve taken from relatives. Are parents stepping in to stop this?

An LCBO (an approved alcohol purveyor) was once caught selling alcohol to a minor wearing a burqa. Is that “socially responsible”?

I find it absurd that the same party that approves of so-called safe injection sites and a sex ed program designed by a convicted child pornographer now decries the sale of alcohol anywhere but province-approved establishments “for the good of the children”.

A post-modern West that holds self-indulgence in any respect as the highest societal good has much bigger problems than where alcohol can be sold. If people raised their children well and didn’t drink and drive, where alcohol can be sold wouldn’t be a problem.

 

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LEVY: Refugees flood into our Sanctuary City

Flanked by three of the socialist councillors who have perpetuated the shelter crisis — Joe Cressy, Ana Bailao and Joe Mihevc — Mayor John Tory indicated to reporters Friday morning that 40% of the shelter system’s 6,991 beds are currently being used by refugees and if this influx keeps up, it will jump to 50% by November. That compares to 25% last fall.

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South Korea and the US to Still Work Closely After Kim Walks From the Summit

Back to square one:

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and U.S. President Donald Trump held discussions on Sunday to ensure that the North Korea-U.S. summit remains on track after North Korea threatened to pull out of the high-level talks.

Moon and Trump spoke over the phone for about 20 minutes, and exchanged their views on North Korea’s recent reactions, South Korea’s presidential office said without elaborating.

“The two leaders will work closely and unwaveringly for the successful hosting of the North Korea- U.S. summit set on June 12, including the upcoming South Korea-U.S. summit,” the presidential official said.

Moon and Trump are set to meet on Tuesday in Washington before North Korean leader Kim Jong Un meets with Trump on June 12 in Singapore.

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Maduro Set For Victory Election

Gee, what a surprise:

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro was seeking a six-year term on Sunday in an apparently poorly attended vote condemned by foes as the “coronation” of a dictator and likely to bring fresh foreign sanctions.

With the mainstream opposition boycotting the election, two of his most popular rivals barred from standing and state institutions in loyalists’ hands, the 55-year-old former bus driver is expected to win despite his unpopularity.

That could trigger oil sanctions from Washington, and more censure from the European Union and Latin America.

The self-described “son” of Hugo Chavez says he is battling an “imperialist” plot to crush socialism and take over the OPEC member’s oil wealth. But opponents say the leftist leader has destroyed Venezuela’s once-wealthy economy and ruthlessly crushed dissent.

Maduro’s main challenger is former state governor Henri Falcon, who predicts an upset due to widespread fury among Venezuela’s 30 million people at the economic meltdown.

Most analysts believe, however, that Falcon has only a slim chance given abstention, the vote-winning power of state handouts, and Maduro’s allies on the election board. Results are expected by late evening.

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At CSICOP: Why millennials and liberals turn to astrology

Astrology Signs Chart From Sturt Vyse at CSICOP:

One of the most noteworthy aspects of belief in astrology is that it is more often embraced by liberals, which places it in the company of the anti-GMO and anti-vaccination movements (Vyse 2015). A 2009 Pew Research Center study found that people who described themselves as liberal were almost twice as likely to say they believe in astrology than self-described conservatives: 30 percent of liberals compared to 16 percent of conservatives (Liu 2009). Similarly, a 2015 study using data from the General Social Survey data of the National Opinion Research Survey at the University of Chicago found that conservatives were more likely to endorse the statement, “we trust too much in science and not enough in religious faith,” and liberals were more likely to have consulted their daily horoscope or astrological profile (DellaPosta, Shi, and Macy 2015, 1482–1483).

According to the Pew study, belief is also more likely to be a youthful phenomenon, with the youngest age group, 18-to-29-year-olds, having a 30 percent belief rate and belief decreasing with each increasing age bracket… More.

Vyse provides a helpful survey of a robust data set that shows that, ever since astrology ceased to be regarded as a science*, it has found a home mainly among people who are not orthodox religious believers. He also provides evidence that interest in astrology is more prevalent among those undergoing life crises who wish they had more control over events. Plus:

The foregoing summary provides a few hints as to why astrology might be surging at the moment. First, it is a youthful movement, and another recent Pew Research Study shows that Millennials are less religious than older generations but not less spiritual. In answer to the question, “Religion is very important,” only 41 percent of Millennials said yes, in comparison to 59 percent of Baby Boomers.

Second, two factors are very likely combining to make astrology more appealing at the moment—liberalism and a need for control. Astrology has a stronger appeal for liberals than conservatives, and in the United States, since November of 2016, the liberal world has been rocked. If ever there was a time when liberals might be looking for a compensatory sense of control, now is it. Conservatives are feeling better, but even if the tables were turned, the Pew survey data suggests they would be more likely to take refuge in religion rather than astrology or other forms of spirituality.

At the risk of setting the cat among the pigeons here, is it possible that belief in superstitions contributes to, and is not merely the result of, political misfortunes? There is a long history of that kind of thing.

* At one time, astrology was considered a science for the perfectly good reason that the heavenly bodies were considered to be bigger and more powerful than Earth. Why would it not be reasonable to believe that they influenced or even controlled events here (as the sun does)? To believe otherwise would be counterintuitive and would require some explanation. Well, the counterintuitive thesis turned out to be correct but the psychological needs cited by Vyse persisted. And not usually among the people some pundits would expect.

See also: Does post-modern naturalism lead to a rise in superstition?

Occult gaining ground among “sciencey liberals”

Skepticism is largely wasted on “skeptics”: Astrology division

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The transgender thought police: Children as young as FOUR are being told by head teacher at ‘trans-friendly’ primary school to tell on pupils who ‘misgender’ their classmates

How do you say Kapo in Tranish?

The policy at Arbury Primary in Cambridge states that it is ‘illegal’ to call someone ‘he/she’ or ‘it’ against their wishes.

The school also urges parents of children who no longer identify as their biological gender to consider changing their name by deed poll.

Arbury holds assemblies to celebrate a child’s ‘transition’ from a boy to a girl or vice versa, has introduced a gender-neutral uniform, and allows children to use lavatories of whichever sex they ‘assign’ themselves to.

Schools making their own laws now. The end of Britain isn’t far off.

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Journalists drink too much, are bad at managing emotions, and operate at a lower level than average, according to a new study

The study, led by Tara Swart, a neuroscientist and leadership coach, analysed 40 journalists from newspapers, magazines, broadcast, and online platforms over seven months. The participants took part in tests related to their lifestyle, health, and behaviour.

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Terror attack survivors urge public to fight terrorism

“None so blind as those that will not see.”

The public must do more to tackle terrorism by standing up to hate, a group of terror attack survivors and relatives has said.

In an open letter released ahead of the Manchester bombing anniversary on Tuesday, they set out a five-point plan to help stop future plots.

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70 Berlin nightclubs to protest AfD march

“The Berlin club culture is everything that Nazis are not. And everything they hate,” the clubs wrote in a joint message that called the AfD “suit-and-tie-Nazis” and PEGIDA “German bratwursts.” “We are progressive, queer, feminist, anti-racist, inclusive, colorful, and we have unicorns. On our dance floors, people from all backgrounds unite, with diverse desires, changing identities and good taste.”

“We cannot dance to this state of things,” they wrote. “Our party will crash their march.”

Don’t you love it when SJWs take themselves way too seriously?

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Meghan’s uninvited family celebrate her wedding with breakfast and CROWNS from Burger King after getting up early to watch the ceremony

Florida is the armpit of ‘Murca. You snowbirds know it’s true!

Meghan Markle’s aunt and cousin in Sanford, Fla., were not invited to the royal wedding – but they did feel like royalty Saturday morning.

Heraunt Teresa, 67, and cousin Nick, 38, hit a Burger King fast-food restaurant near their home in Sanford, Florida, after the live television broadcast of the wedding of Meghan and Prince Harry finished.

They shared a quick breakfast on throw-away plates then left with coffees and Burger King’s cardboard emblem – golden crowns.

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