Author Archives: Osumashi

And Now, A Happy Story

 

So moving:

Mohammad Alaa Jaleel who founded Il Gattaro d’Aleppo (The Cat Man of Aleppo), provides a refuge for cats that have been left behind because of war in Syria.

He came across a street dog named Amira, and began to care for her the best he could. When they discovered that she was pregnant, Alaa gave up his room so she could have a comfortable place to rest.

Since they have 80 feline residents, to keep every animal comfortable, Alaa built a little house for the dog next to the sanctuary.

A couple weeks ago, Amira went into labor, but sadly, all three puppies were stillborn. It left her broken hearted. “We were sad and shocked… We gave her a stuffed teddy bear and tried to cuddle with her because she was very sad,” Alessandra Abidin, volunteer of the rescue group, told Love Meow.

That’s when Junior, a kitten they took in from the streets, noticed the teddy bear, and decided to approach it and the dog.

She slowly walked up to Amira and eventually made her way to her paws. Then she proceeded to rub her face on her. It was then things began to change.

A few days later, Amira was no longer holding her teddy bear.

Instead, she was playing with a tiny kitten on her back and tending to her like a mother would her puppies.

 

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Horvath Will NOT Have Alcohol Sold in Corner-stores

And that is why she will lose votes:

The current system of restricted retail beer and wine sales in Ontario works well and is socially responsible, New Democrat Leader Andrea Horwath said Saturday.

Campaigning in Thunder Bay, Ont., Horwath said there’s no need to allow convenience stores to carry the products — a perennially favoured if never-implemented idea that once helped propel the Liberals to office in the mid-1980s.

“I’m going to be straight up about it: I don’t think we need to have beer and wine in the corner stores,” Horwath said. “I don’t think this is a broken system in Ontario. I don’t necessarily think that we need to mess with it. It’s working fine for people.”

The prospect of liberalized sales surfaced during the June 7 campaign when Progressive Conservative Leader Doug Ford said he would allow corner-store sales of beer and wine if he’s elected premier.

 

Granted, alcohol being sold to children is a great concern but it is also a red herring.

Teen-agers are experimenting with synthetic drugs and are using prescription drugs they’ve taken from relatives. Are parents stepping in to stop this?

An LCBO (an approved alcohol purveyor) was once caught selling alcohol to a minor wearing a burqa. Is that “socially responsible”?

I find it absurd that the same party that approves of so-called safe injection sites and a sex ed program designed by a convicted child pornographer now decries the sale of alcohol anywhere but province-approved establishments “for the good of the children”.

A post-modern West that holds self-indulgence in any respect as the highest societal good has much bigger problems than where alcohol can be sold. If people raised their children well and didn’t drink and drive, where alcohol can be sold wouldn’t be a problem.

 

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South Korea and the US to Still Work Closely After Kim Walks From the Summit

Back to square one:

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and U.S. President Donald Trump held discussions on Sunday to ensure that the North Korea-U.S. summit remains on track after North Korea threatened to pull out of the high-level talks.

Moon and Trump spoke over the phone for about 20 minutes, and exchanged their views on North Korea’s recent reactions, South Korea’s presidential office said without elaborating.

“The two leaders will work closely and unwaveringly for the successful hosting of the North Korea- U.S. summit set on June 12, including the upcoming South Korea-U.S. summit,” the presidential official said.

Moon and Trump are set to meet on Tuesday in Washington before North Korean leader Kim Jong Un meets with Trump on June 12 in Singapore.

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Maduro Set For Victory Election

Gee, what a surprise:

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro was seeking a six-year term on Sunday in an apparently poorly attended vote condemned by foes as the “coronation” of a dictator and likely to bring fresh foreign sanctions.

With the mainstream opposition boycotting the election, two of his most popular rivals barred from standing and state institutions in loyalists’ hands, the 55-year-old former bus driver is expected to win despite his unpopularity.

That could trigger oil sanctions from Washington, and more censure from the European Union and Latin America.

The self-described “son” of Hugo Chavez says he is battling an “imperialist” plot to crush socialism and take over the OPEC member’s oil wealth. But opponents say the leftist leader has destroyed Venezuela’s once-wealthy economy and ruthlessly crushed dissent.

Maduro’s main challenger is former state governor Henri Falcon, who predicts an upset due to widespread fury among Venezuela’s 30 million people at the economic meltdown.

Most analysts believe, however, that Falcon has only a slim chance given abstention, the vote-winning power of state handouts, and Maduro’s allies on the election board. Results are expected by late evening.

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Japanese Least Offended by Eurovision Winner’s “Cultural Appropriation”

Yep:

Once again, Japan comes out as the least offended when someone seemingly appropriates their culture.

The 63rd annual Eurovision Song Contest, perhaps the world’s largest example of humanity’s peculiar obsession with making music a competitive sport, came to a close last week. In the end it was Israeli singer Netta (Netta Barzilai) who took top honors with her song “Toy.”

Seems to me if she really wanted to co-opt Japanese culture, Netta ought to get 47 more singers and then set up a convoluted hierarchy based on sales of singles, all operating under a rigid behavioral policy similar to that of a 19th century schoolmarm.

But I could be wrong, so let’s go to the netizens of Japan for judgement.

“The millions of Japanese people with dyed hair must be laughing at this.”
“Westerners care too much about silly things.”
“Culture is meant to be stolen. If it’s not worth stealing, then it isn’t culture.”
“If people keep claiming ‘cultural appropriation’ then people will not touch our culture. Then, people will not understand our culture and it will be easier to become our enemy.”

 

Wasn’t this sort of thing fresh and original when Bjork did it? :

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NDP Candidate Refers to Remembrance Day As “Brain-Washing”

Scratch an NDP MP, as they say … :

And now, Toronto Sun Journalist Joe Warmington has uncovered comments made by Laura Kaminker – the Ontario NDP candidate for Mississauga Centre.

Here’s what Kaminker said about Remembrance Day:

“I just wear my peace button on my jacket as always and wait for the collective brainwashing to blow over. When our masters give the signal, everyone can take off the fake poppy — made with prison labour — and create a bit more landfill. And another annual ritual of war glorification comes to a close.”

Warmington points out that Kaminker “refers to veterans as “heroes” in quotation marks and asks is “every ‘hero’ honoured, every flag waved, every resounding exhortation about the troops ‘protecting our way of life,’ is a conscious act, and a political one.”

She also seemed tired with people talking about September 11, saying “enough already.”

And is if that isn’t all bad enough, Warmington points out that she once talked about “Marxism 2011 program notes” from a conference she described as a “weekend of inspiration, education, and revolution.”

Kaminker is originally from the United States.

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What He Meant to Say Was …

Let the Great Cover-Up begin:

CBC News has learned a Canadian man who says he spent time in Syria with ISIS and committed violent acts was interviewed by the RCMP this week.

He was neither arrested nor charged with any offences, and was allowed to return home.

There were angry questions in the House of Commons earlier this month, when Conservative House leader Candice Bergen asked the Trudeau government why the man is freely being allowed to live here.

“This guy is apparently in Toronto. Canadians deserve more answers from this government,” she said. “Why aren’t they doing something about this despicable animal that’s walking around the country?” 

The man is known publicly as Abu Huzaifa al-Kanadi (Abu Huzaifa the Canadian). Details of his story have been a study in contradictions — not only for police but for the journalists covering him.

He says he travelled to Syria in 2014 to join ISIS, and fled months later in disillusionment with their violent tactics. And, depending on who he’s talking to, he either witnessed killings in the name of jihad, or carried them out himself.

The man gave two very different accounts of his time with ISIS to CBC News and the New York Times. The contradictions only came to light after both news organizations published their stories.

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North Korea Demands the Return of Defectors

The background of this story is here.

North Korea on Saturday reiterated its demands for South Korea to send back 12 North Korean restaurant workers who came to the South in 2016, saying such a move would demonstrate Seoul’s willingness to improve relations.

The statement by North Korea’s Red Cross came a week after Seoul said it would look more closely into the circumstances surrounding the women’s arrival following a media report that suggested some of them might have been brought to the South against their will.

A claim that is highly dubious to say the very least.

 

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Nigeria Promises to Dissuade Nationals From Crossing Into Canada

Sure, it will:

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen says the Nigerian government has pledged to discourage its citizens from claiming asylum in Canada by crossing between ports of entry along the U.S. border.

Mr. Hussen travelled to Nigeria this week as a part of a federal government effort to contain the surge of asylum seekers – most of whom are Nigerian – at the Canada-U.S. border. He said Nigerian Foreign Minister Geoffrey Onyeama and other senior government officials committed to deter Nigerians from using the U.S. as a transit point to cross into Canada and claim asylum.

“They will take that opportunity onward to use that messaging from us to remind people that crossing the border irregularly is not a free ticket to Canada and that there’s consequences,” Mr. Hussen told reporters after his three-day trip to the West African country.

The minister also spoke with a number of Nigerian media outlets, including radio stations, to dispel the “myths” about Canada’s asylum system.

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New Editor of Phnom Penh Post Defends His New Start

For the new Year Zero:

The new owner of Cambodia’s beleaguered Phnom Penh Post on Friday denied links to the country’s authoritarian government and defended a stormy takeover which saw journalists resign en masse over fears for editorial independence.

The May 4 takeover of the English-language daily by Malaysian investor Siva Kumar G after he purchased the paper last month sent a shudder of dread through advocates of free expression in the kingdom, where premier Hun Sen has crushed all criticism in the run-up to July elections.

The buyer also owns Asia PR, a company that once worked for Cambodia’s government, stirring alarm over apparent cosy links with the ruling party.

Hun Sen has dismantled the fragile democracy’s once-vibrant media scene over the past year, with the Post one of few remaining watchdogs in the graft-riddled country.

The paper’s main rival, the Cambodia Daily, was among media closed last year as part of a wider crackdown on critics ahead of 2018 polls that Hun Sen is determined to win.

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Ethics Czar Investigates Fisheries Minister Over License

The federal ethics watchdog is examining the actions of Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc over the granting of a controversial clam fishing licence.

The office of conflict of interest and ethics commissioner Mario Dion said Friday that confidentiality requirements limit it to revealing that a probe into LeBlanc’s conduct in relation to an unspecified licence began May 11.

However, The Canadian Press has independently confirmed the investigation concerns a multimillion-dollar licence to fish Arctic surf clam in waters off Newfoundland and Labrador and Nova Scotia.

Conservative MP Todd Doherty has been pressing the Liberal government for weeks about how Five Nations Clam Co., won the licence.

The deal, which ended a monopoly on the Arctic clam fishery held by Clearwater Seafoods since 1999, was supposed to offer 25 per cent of the catch to local Indigenous communities as a way of promoting reconciliation and economic growth.

The company, it turns out, has ties to the Liberal party and several sitting Liberal MPs, including LeBlanc himself. 

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Founder of Aboriginal Group Decried As “Fake”

The former chief of the Mikinaks, a self-proclaimed Indigenous community that gained infamy in 2016, is now fending off threats and online harassment because she’s received Indian status.

Lise Brisebois said all she wants is peace, but her notoriety for founding the so-called Mikinak community makes it difficult to escape attention. 

Earlier this month, she learned that someone had shared a photo of her status card on Facebook, ridiculing her. 

​”They say that I’m not an Indian. That I’m a fake Indian,” Brisebois said.

“I had to disconnect my home phone because I was receiving threats … And they write me privately [on Facebook] and they call me all sorts of names.”

When Brisebois read one comment suggesting that someone should “finish her,” she said she reported it to the Kahnawake Peacekeepers. 

“I said I want it to stop. I want them to stop saying mean things to me.” 

Brisebois first grabbed headlines in 2016 when she founded the Mikinaks, under the Confederation of Aboriginal Peoples of Canada.

At the time, Montreal-area Mohawk leaders blasted the new group, calling it “nothing but lies” and an attempt to evade taxes.

Brisebois said she later severed ties with the group, and no longer calls herself their chief.

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Tories Would Allow Alcohol In Cornerstores

 

Doug Ford said Friday that a Progressive Conservative government would allow beer and wine to be sold in Ontario corner stores, timing his announcement with the start of a long weekend.

The Liberal government started expanding alcohol sales in 2015 to up to 450 grocery stores, but said it would not include other retail outlets. Grocers are selected through a competitive bidding process held by the Liquor Control Board of Ontario.

The Tories would allow beer, wine, cider and coolers to be sold in corner stores, box stores and any grocery store, Ford announced. 

“As we approach the Victoria Day weekend, it is time to acknowledge that Ontario is mature enough for this change and ready to join other jurisdictions in making life a little more convenient,” Ford said in a statement.

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Muslim Leaders Demand International Protection Force for Palestinians

The same Palestinians who are put in camps in Arab countries:

Muslim leaders called on Friday for an international force to be deployed to protect Palestinians after dozens of protesters were shot dead by Israeli forces on the Gaza border this week.

At a special summit in Turkey convened by President Tayyip Erdogan, they also pledged to take “appropriate political (and) economic measures” against countries that followed the United States in moving their Israel embassies to contested Jerusalem from Tel Aviv.

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Teen Accused In Texas High School Shootings Used Father’s Guns

Oh, dear:

The Texas student charged in the school shooting at Santa Fe High School described planning the attack in private journals, including a plan to kill himself, posted an image on Facebook of a “Born to Kill” shirt and used his father’s shotgun and pistol in the rampage that left 10 dead and 10 wounded, authorities said Friday.

A motive wasn’t immediately clear, but Gov. Greg Abbott said Dimitrios Pagourtzis, 17, wrote about planning the attack in journals on his computer and in his cellphone that police obtained. That was inconsistent with the portrait painted by his friends — a reserved young man, an athlete who had discussed wanting to own guns but who was said not to have given warning signs of impending violence.

“Not only did he want to commit the shooting but he wanted to commit suicide after the shooting,” Abbott said, adding that Pagourtzis told authorities he “didn’t have the courage” to take his own life.

President Donald Trump ordered flags to be lowered to half-staff in honor of the victims and their families.

Pagourtzis was held without bond in the Galveston County jail on charges of capital murder, said the county sheriff, Henry Trochesset. Abbott said the two guns used in the attack were owned legally by the suspect’s father. It was not clear whether the father knew his son had taken them.

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