Category Archives: Immigration

Disability rights advocates fight ‘demeaning’ immigration criteria

The Council of Canadians with Disabilities is calling for the repeal of a provision that bars immigrants with disabilities from settling in Canada on grounds that they could place too much demand on the country’s medical system. The group contends the practice is discriminatory and based on outdated, stereotypical ideas around disability.

Why should disabled persons get special treatment for immigration? Are they being persecuted because of their disabilities?

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50 New Immigration Judges on Duty, and 370 More Coming

The United States is on the verge of reversing an immigration court backlog that has been building for years, Attorney General Jeff Sessions testified Tuesday.

Immigration hawks long have pointed to the backlog, now about 600,000 cases, as a factor in undermining enforcement. Sessions told the House Judiciary Committee that the backlog has barely grown during the past two to three months as a result of 50 additional immigration judges who have started working since President Donald Trump took office.

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Violence Spirals At Refugee Shelters In Germany

Violent crime, including murder, rape and physical assault, is running rampant in German asylum shelters, according to a leaked intelligence report. German authorities, who appear powerless to stem the rising tide of violence, have justified their failure to inform the public about the scale of the problem by citing the privacy rights of the criminal offenders.

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Canada to admit 340,000 immigrants a year by 2020 under new three-year plan

The increases will bring immigration to Canada to nearly 1 per cent of the population — a figure that many have cited as necessary for the Canadian economy to remain competitive as it confronts the realities of an aging workforce and declining birth rate.

Finally (and probably accidentally) the truth: population replacement.

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Immigration is Europe’s biggest threat ever

Isn’t it ironic that the policy of free access into Europe that dissolved frontiers, has led to lifting barriers and rising blockades in our streets? Cities like Amsterdam, London, Paris, Berlin and Rome have started to ‘enrich’ themselves with anti-terrorism strategies. With those measures life might proceed in a usual and fashionable way, just like the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan wants us to believe that living in a big city and that threats of terror attacks are “part and parcel of living in a big city”.

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Yazidi Woman Waits to Be Reunited With Son

A Winnipeg woman who escaped the horrors of captivity at the hands of Iraqi militants was overjoyed to recently discover that her 12-year-old son has been rescued and is recovering from gunshot wounds at a refugee camp.

Now, the mission for Nofa Mihlo Zaghla has become getting Canadian officials to help reunite her with her boy.

On Wednesday, the Yazidi Association of Manitoba went public with her story in the hopes of spurring officials to act quickly to get young Emad to Canada.

“We’re asking to bring that child to be reunited with his mother,” pleaded association president Hadji Hesso, his voice filled with passion. “That’s all we want. That’s all the mother wants. It’s all the child wants.”

 

Just a reminder:

“We need to think about families who cross the ocean, desperately seeking to build a better life for themselves and for their kids,” said Trudeau to an audience of supporters during a morning campaign stop in Toronto.

“And to know that somewhere in the Prime Minister’s Office staffers were poring through their personal files to try and see … which families would be suitable for a photo-op for the prime minister’s re-election campaign. That’s disgusting.”

 

And:

Michelle Rempel needs to get angry more often.

The 36-year-old former Conservative cabinet minister, now the Official Opposition critic for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, was the driving force behind Tuesday’s 313-0 House of Commons vote requiring Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government to get its act together and open Canada’s doors to the persecuted Yazidi minority of Iraqi Kurdistan.

 

And:

Nearly 400 Yazidi refugees and other survivors of Islamist extremists have already been accepted over the last four months, Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen said in announcing the initiative, which is expected to cost $28 million.

But unlike the thousands of refugees fleeing violence in Syria who were greeted by flashing cameras and intense public exposure, the Yazidis have been entering the country with no fanfare.

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Pope Supports Merkel On Africa, Migrants And Climate Change

Pope Francis and Angela Merkel share the same aim to “bring down walls,” not build them, and agree on the importance of international treaties and commitment to Africa. This is what emerges from the encounter – a “cordial discussion”, as the Holy See defines it in a brief communique – between Pope Francis and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, received yesterday with her husband, Joachim Sauer in the Vatican apostolic Palace.

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According to A Recent Poll, Canadians Are Inexcusably Canadian

 

Yahoo Canada partnered with Ipsos Public Affairs to explore how Canadians view their relationships with the world and each other. In today’s political climate, we wanted to see whether we are actually as welcoming, inclusive and progressive as we seem in comparison to countries such as the United States and England, seeking to tighten their borders and rethink multilateralism.

Throughout April, we surveyed Canadians to gauge sentiment on the national priorities, and core values that define us. We also wanted to know how the election of Donald Trump as president of the U.S. has affected Canadians’ impressions of leadership qualities and their own mobility.

Why are Canadians forever comparing themselves to the Americans? Are we not strong enough to say who we are and what we think? Do we compare ourselves to the Japanese or the Norwegians?

Overall, the data suggests Canadians are most concerned about maintaining our “social solidarity” by prioritizing a strong health care system for all and reducing poverty and the nation’s economic burdens.

Oy gevalt …

More startling, however, was evidence that the nationalistic sentiments that gained traction in the U.S. during last year’s presidential election may have migrated north. More than half of respondents appear worried that immigrants and refugees are causing an erosion of “Canadian values” and public safety.

That’s not to say Canadians oppose helping the less fortunate. Wide margins of Canadians support taxpayer-funded poverty alleviation programs. That more compassionate touch is displayed by Canadians’ preference for Justin Trudeau’s leadership style over that of Donald Trump. …

Why not private charities? Funnelling tax payer money into a reckless government isn’t indicative of great social empathy. It’s foisting a problem onto someone else by throwing cash at it. It displays a moral aloofness. Is this a Canadian value? One would have to explain those who do put time and effort into charities instead of relying on someone else to keep things out of mind and sight.

Trudeau’s leadership style is far less humane than that of Trump’s:

Trudeau says the PMO was making sure it could take political advantage of those families that were being accepted, something he calls “disgusting.”

He says a Liberal government would “absolutely not” prioritize religious and ethnic minorities.

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Michelle Rempel needs to get angry more often.

The 36-year-old former Conservative cabinet minister, now the Official Opposition critic for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, was the driving force behind Tuesday’s 313-0 House of Commons vote requiring Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government to get its act together and open Canada’s doors to the persecuted Yazidi minority of Iraqi Kurdistan.

**

But unlike the thousands of refugees fleeing violence in Syria who were greeted by flashing cameras and intense public exposure, the Yazidis have been entering the country with no fanfare. That won’t change, say government officials who are protecting the identity of the asylum seekers because of just how vulnerable they are.

“Some of these women haven’t even told their own families about what they experienced” at the hands of their persecutors, associate deputy immigration minister Dawn Edlund told a news conference alongside Hussen.

 

Trudeau in full selfie mode with the Syrians he let in.

 

However, few issues have received as much public attention this year as immigration and refugees policies. Scenes of happy Syrian families arriving at Canadian airports have been replaced by more ominous stories of asylum seekers trying to navigate across the Canada-U.S. border in the freezing dead of night.

While almost no one questions the idea that Canada has become a nation of immigrants, if not recent arrivals the certainly first- and second-generation communities, poll data shows many now are wary of immigrants and refugees.

A slim majority of Canadians polled, 57 per cent and 55 per cent respectively, say refugees and new immigrants are a threat to Canadian values. A further 53 per cent of say refugees threatened Canada’s safety.

I wonder why they would say a thing like that?

Oh, yeah

If anything, this poll indicates how static Canadians are. So attached to their substandard public services run by an incompetent centralised government and willing to live in the shadow of the Americans, Canadians just can’t put their shoulders to the wheel and move this country along.

 

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