Category Archives: Canada’s Corrupt Liberal Government

Canada grants refugee status in about 60% of illegal alien invader cases

Over half of the migrant asylum claims heard by Canadian refugee officials this year have been successful.

New figures released by the federal Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) show that of 1,572 claims heard so far, 941 have been granted.

The IRB has a backlog of 12,895 cases currently pending.

Canada has seen a spike recent months of migrants crossing illegally into the country via the US and making asylum claims.

The new figures look at claims received by the IRB from “irregular border crossers” between February and October of this year.

Those made by migrants from Syria, Eritrea, Yemen, Sudan, Djibouti and Turkey were the most likely to be accepted.

Share

Chief Liberal Party fundraiser tied to $8M loan to offshore trust in Cayman Islands

Newly discovered documents from the Paradise Papers show the Liberal Party’s top fundraiser, Stephen Bronfman, was directly linked to companies that were owed millions by an offshore Cayman Islands trust well into the 2000s — despite his strong denials he had any involvement in the trust after 1998.

The documents show how a Delaware-based company closely connected to the Montreal-based financier was owed $8 million from the Kolber Trust, set up for former Liberal Sen. Leo Kolber and his family in the no-tax Cayman Islands.

Share

Immigration policy is out of control and needs an overhaul

Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party

The Trudeau government’s plan to bring in close to one million new immigrants within the next three years should be of serious concern to Canadians. Next year alone, the numbers are expected to reach 310,000 but to that total must be added approximately 900,000 temporary foreign workers and foreign students who will be living in Canada. Since most of the newcomers will be settling in three of our major cities, the pressure on infrastructure and local services will be extreme.

Canada’s current immigration policy is based on myths. All of our political parties, most of the news media, big business interests, the banks and land developers favour large-scale immigration and justify this on the grounds that immigration helps our economy, strengthens the labour force and alleviates our aging problem.

Now haven’t we been arguing just these points on this blog for … Oh I don’t know how many years?

Share

Premier to Host Town Hall Meeting on Fairness and Opportunity

Ontario Seeking Public Input on Plan to Help People Get Ahead in Changing Economy

Premier Kathleen Wynne is inviting people to a town hall meeting to share their ideas about the government’s plan to create a fairer, better Ontario for all.The Premier’s Town Hall will take place at the Concert Hall at 888 Yonge St., formerly the Masonic Temple, in Toronto today, Monday, November 20 and will be moderated by Jane Taber, Vice-President of Public Affairs for NATIONAL Public Relations and former political reporter for The Globe and Mail. The Town Hall is free admission and open to anyone who wants to share their ideas on education, health care, job security, housing and other issues that matter most to them, their families and people across the province.

General admission seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis at the Concert Hall. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. with the Premier’s Town Hall beginning at 6:30 p.m.

h/t Marvin

Share

Bonokoski: Another suspected terrorist zeroing in on lottery win

On Thursday, the Federal Court of Canada began a two-day session hearing arguments from terror suspect Mohamed Harkat to have less critical and probing eyes monitoring his activities.

Why even bother?

Share

Article: “Canada does not engage in death squads,’ while allies actively hunt down their own foreign fighters”

… says lackey:

Stewart, a former diplomat, continued: “These are people who are executing people … who have held women and children hostage, who are torturing and murdering, trying, by violence, to impose their will. Our response has to be, when somebody does that, I’m afraid, to deal with that.”

Those words may sound chilling, but they reflect a country that’s suffered several brutal jihadi attacks in recent years, and sees jihadi returnees as a threat. Other countries have come to the same conclusion.

But Canadians who join the militant group have so far had little to fear from their own government, either at home or abroad.

The British government has co-operated with the U.S. on drone strikes that killed two of Britain’s most notorious ISIS members: Mohammed Emwazi (aka Jihadi John) and Junaid Hussain.

The Sunday Times reports that Britain’s Special Air Service, SAS, has been given a “kill list” of British jihadis, including  notorious ISIS recruiter and convert Sally Jones, and a dozen others with British university degrees in technical fields such as electronics.

Brett McGurk, former U.S. president Barack Obama’s special envoy for the fight against ISIS, who retains his post under Donald Trump, stated it explicitly on a recent visit to Syria. “Our mission is to make sure that any foreign fighter who is here, who joined ISIS from a foreign country and came into Syria, that they will die here in Syria.”

“They’re not just talking about it,” said Christian Leuprecht, an expert on terrorism and security at Royal Military College in Kingston, Ont. “Australia is another country that’s taken the same approach — that they would prefer that those individuals who’ve been identified as foreign fighters not return home.”

France, too, is working to eradicate its jihadis overseas. A Wall Street Journal investigation published in May quoted French and Iraqi officials describing French special forces co-operating with Iraqi units to hunt down and kill French jihadis.

But Canada is taking a different approach. 

“Canada does not engage in death squads,” Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale told CBC’s Power & Politics on Friday. 

“With the battlefield activity winding down, there is a very real question about where the foreign fighters go, and all of our allies, whether they’re in the Five Eyes or the G7, we’ve all agreed to collaborate very carefully.”

Goodale said anyone who poses a terrorist risk, homegrown or from elsewhere, is viewed “with the greatest of seriousness” by Canada’s intelligence, security and police agencies.

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan said his department’s job is ensuring foreign fighters don’t become a threat.

“We will make sure that we put every type of resource into place so Canadians are well protected,” he told a crowd at the Halifax International Security Forum on Friday.

These thugs don’t become a threat once they are vapourised.

But I repeat myself.

Share

Promises, promises: The Liberals made a lot, maybe too many

Only the naive person views the politician without skepticism. But a politician’s words are still important, not least because what he or she says they will do is generally in line with what they do.

That’s the finding across three studies of campaign promises dating back more than 70 years, though there are differences in methodology. More often than not, federal governments in Canada keep their promises.

Share

Provincial climate plans will cost billions with likely little environmental benefit

“Across the country, ineffective climate policies will cost taxpayers billions with little to show for it,” said Kenneth Green, Fraser Institute’s senior director of energy and natural resource studies and author of Canada’s Climate Action Plans: Are they cost-effective?

Share

Column: “Don’t trust the Liberals to run their own promise tracker”

Well, obviously:

The government’s launch of its own online promise tracker on Tuesday tells us that either the Liberals are incredibly naive or they think that of us. It’s hard to know which is worse.

 

The Liberals are performing like four different kinds of crap.

That is the assessment of someone who isn’t a Liberal.

Share

The Liberals Beclown Themselves in the Coal Fight

Not one of these yahoos is fit to comment on natural resources or what might replace them without destroying the economy. Unwittingly or not, they are ruining the country and people are letting them:

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wants to divert public attention away from the embarrassing reality Canada is far behind fulfilling his 2015 Paris climate accord commitments to reduce our industrial greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions linked to climate change.

That’s why Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna is declaring a “war on coal,” in conjunction with the U.K., at this week’s annual United Nations’ gabfest on climate change in Bonn, Germany.

 

Share

Article: “Canada to watch from the sidelines amid ‘extraordinary times’ in global energy markets”

Read the whole thing:

Two major trends are unfolding in global oil and gas markets, but Canada seems unable to take advantage of the first one, and is already an unfortunate casualty of the other, says a new report.

First, the world’s energy demand will rise the equivalent of China and India’s current energy consumption over the next three decades — but Canada has limited direct conduits to connect those energy-hungry markets to its store of the world’s third-largest oil reserves.

The second development, which has already dented the Canadian oilpatch, is the rise of U.S. tight oil and gas that is taking dollars and focus away from the Western Canadian industry.

The global energy markets are in the midst of “extraordinary times”, writes Fatih Birol, executive director at the International Energy Agency in its annual World Energy Outlook, launched in Paris on Tuesday.

The benchmark report notes that with renewable energy technologies nipping at the heels of oil, natural gas and coal and a global push by policymakers to cut carbon emissions, juxtaposed with near-insatiable demand from a global population that will hit 9 billion within a few decades and the rise of the U.S. as the world’s largest oil and gas producer, the energy sector is experiencing disruptive times.

Amid these upheavals, Canada will likely remain a minor actor, its global plans dashed partially through self-restraint and rules, and also by its next-door neighbour who is upending global markets and disrupting Canada’s plans to export oil and gas in the process.

 

Share

Trudeau In the Philippines

Crying Barbie (courtesy of an acerbic commenter) declares that “Canada is back“:

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s invitation to the East Asia Summit, a key forum for regional and global security discussions, is a sign Canada’s aggressive overtures in the region have paid off, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Sunday.

Canada has been invited to the summit for the first time as an observer, officials said, and Trudeau will be privy to high-level talks, alongside the likes of Chinese President Xi Jinping, on the tenuous security situation in North Korea.

“This is the first time Canada will be present … that is a really big deal,” Freeland told reporters about the two-day summit in Manila that starts Monday. “The East Asia Summit is the top table in Asia on security issues. Canada has never been there before, so when the prime minister says ‘Canada is back,’ the fact that he has been invited … is a very, very important sign of that.

“Our government is acting on our pledge that ‘Canada is back,’ and the world is recognizing that,” she said.

 

Also:

A coalition of Filipino and Canadian activists is calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to do what U.S. President Donald Trump seems loath to do: raise the “appalling” state of human rights in the southeast Asian country with its populist president, Rodrigo Duterte.

 

To wit:

A sister of Robert Hall, one of two Canadian hostages beheaded in the Philippines earlier this year, is demanding an inquiry into how the Trudeau Liberals handled the high-profile kidnapping case—saying government officials “literally did the least they possibly could” to help rescue her 66-year-old brother.

 

 

Share

Ethics commissioner investigating Morneau’s sponsorship of pension bill

OTTAWA — Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson has confirmed she has launched a formal investigation into whether Finance Minister Bill Morneau has broken federal ethics law over his sponsorship of Bill C-27.

“We always are as careful as we can be to use the word examination when we’re talking about having launched an examination. Otherwise, we say we’re looking into something. It’s because when the media gets that word ‘investigation’ they confuse it between the two activities so we avoid the word investigation,” Dawson told CTV News.

Get with the program! What is civic duty but the opportunity to line Liberal Party member’s pockets?

Share