Category Archives: Canada’s incompetent Liberal Government

Majority of Canadians disapprove of government’s handling of ̷i̷r̷r̷e̷g̷u̷l̷a̷r̷ ̷b̷o̷r̷d̷e̷r̷ ̷c̷r̷o̷s̷s̷i̷n̷g̷s̷ ̷ illegal alien invaders: poll

A majority of Canadians give the federal government bad marks for the way it has handled asylum seekers entering Canada between official border crossings, a new poll suggests.

Sixty-eight per cent of respondents believe the government is handling the issue of irregular asylum seekers poorly, according to the DART Insight poll prepared for Postmedia. In contrast, 65 per cent of respondents feel the federal government is doing a good job managing the regular immigration system.

The latter finding makes no sense to me unless you support the conversion of Canada into a balkanized low trust society that despises you and your heritage and the accompanying lowered living standards and overall quality of life brought about by mass immigration.

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Tories table motion calling for government strategy on returning ISIS members

The political debate over what to do with Canadians who were part of the so-called Islamic State returned to Parliament on Monday, with the Conservatives demanding a federal strategy on the matter.

An opposition motion tabled in the House of Commons called on the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to put forward a plan within 45 days for bringing to justice those who fought with ISIS.

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How much Trudeau’s carbon tax will cost you

Hold onto your wallet because Justin Trudeau is coming to raid it.

A report out this week on the cancellation of Ontario’s cap-and-trade system revealed the feds will be looking for more of your cash over the next few years, all thanks to the carbon tax.

Sorry, that should say “price on pollution,” which is the latest catchphrase introduced by the Trudeau Liberals to obscure reality.

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The Race to October 2019

The popular press will do anything rather than admit that Justin and his friends are in trouble:

Twelve months from now, Canadians will pass judgment on the Trudeau government and decide whether its first mandate should be its last or if it deserves another four years.

As the one-year countdown to the next federal election on Oct. 21, 2019 starts ticking, Justin Trudeau’s Liberals appear reasonably well positioned to win a second term.

But a year is a lifetime in politics and the coming one promises to be particularly challenging for the Liberals, beset by a growing phalanx of hostile conservative premiers determined to put a spoke in Trudeau’s pre-election wheel.

In particular, they’re aiming to upend the introduction of a carbon tax — one of Trudeau’s signature policies, the central pillar of the Liberal plan for combating climate change.

It’s the next big thing on the government’s agenda and it’s the pivotal issue upon which Liberal strategists privately believe the next election will turn. It’s a fight they think they can win.

 

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Freeland Denies Being Pressured Into Making Last-Minute USMCA Deal

Sure, Chrystia. Sure:

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says that anyone who thinks the new trilateral North American trade agreement limits Canada’s trade sovereignty is misguided.

Freeland told Chris Hall, host of CBC Radio’s The House, that the section of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement that lays out the rules for making pacts with “non-market” countries won’t limit Canada’s attempts to diversify its markets.

“It’s the one element of the modernized NAFTA that has not been fully understood by Canadians,” she said Thursday.

“There is nothing new in this clause and in the new agreement that restricts Canadian sovereignty in any way.”

Section 32.10 of the deal’s text states that a USMCA country must give three months’ notice to the other two parties before negotiating a free trade agreement with any country considered to be “non-market” — and therefore ineligible — by one of the USMCA partners.

Many have taken this to be a direct reference to China, as the U.S. has been engaged in a tariff battle with Beijing for months. Hundreds of billions of dollars worth of products have been affected, drawing retaliation from China.

U.S. President Donald Trump has taken aim at the dumping of foreign steel and aluminum by China. He also imposed steel and aluminum tariffs on Canada, Mexico and the European Union back in May, using a little-known U.S. law to declare those metals imports a threat to “national security.”

China has been critical of the new trilateral deal, saying the U.S. is trying to undermine its trade with Canada and Mexico.

 

In other news:

Canada’s embrace of American-style protectionist measures to prop up domestic steelmakers is set to increase costs for consumers and secondary manufacturers — assuming they can even find steel to buy amid current shortages.

It’s also offending key trading partners.

As of next Thursday, a 25 per cent surtax will be applied to all foreign imports of seven specific kinds of steel once they exceed historical average volumes. It’s an emergency tool the federal government’s never used before. Many manufacturers would love to stop it from being used now.

“It is going to kill businesses,” said trade lawyer Cyndee Todgham Cherniak. Her firm, LexSage, represents clients trying to persuade the Canadian International Trade Tribunal to reverse Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s decision at hearings scheduled for January.

“Exactly what we said shouldn’t be done to us, we’ve done to other countries. And, quite frankly, to our own businesses.”

Canada already has 78 different trade remedies (duties) in place for countries like China who’ve been caught dumping steel. This new surtax is part of a push to curb global overproduction and keep cheap steel from sneaking into North American supply chains.

But in the process, Canada’s surtax also hits fairly-traded steel from countries Canada normally counts as allies, including Japan and the European Union.

Companies already finding it hard to source quality, affordable steel are about to see more of their best options taxed.

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It’s Just Money

The Economist this week warns policy makers to “start preparing for the next recession” while they still can. The release of the government of Canada’s annual financial report for the 2017-18 fiscal year, however suggests the Trudeau Liberals have no notion of foregoing that most enjoyable of all entitlements: spending other people’s money.

The annual budget is an aspirational document, revealing what the government would like to do. But the annual report is a look in the rearview mirror at what it did in the year ending March 31, 2018.

This year is complicated by a restatement of the public finances going back years to factor in an accounting change. (The Auditor General ordered the restatement, related to discounted and unfunded pension obligations, and it adds an additional $20 billion to the federal debt, which now stands at $671 billion.) But the story is relatively simple — 2017-18 was a bumper year for government revenues, which rose by $20 billion, or 6.9 per cent, from the previous year.

Personal income tax increases accounted for half of that flood of new money coming into the coffers, around half of which was related to economic growth and the other half to the unwinding of tax planning that had suppressed revenues in 2016-17 (when the Liberals announced they were going to raise the top rate of income tax to 33 per cent in late 2015, there was a rush of filing by high-income earners to declare income at the lower rate).

Yet, rather than reduce the deficit and pay down debt in preparation for the next recession, creeping toward them as inevitably as mortality, the Liberals spent the lot. In 2017-18 expenses amounted to $332.6 billion — breaching the $300-billion mark for the second time — up $20.1 billion, or 6.4 per cent from 2016-17.

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Article: “Feds dead set against ‘ridiculous’ quotas to replace steel, aluminum tariffs”

Good luck with that, Justin:

Canada is not about to agree to quotas or other limits on its exports in order to get the United States to lift punishing tariffs on steel and aluminum, says a source close to the ongoing talks to resolve the lingering tit-for-tat trade standoff.

Where the two sides ultimately end up remains to be seen, but the Canadian source — speaking on condition of anonymity in order to discuss sensitive negotiations — described the idea of a quota system as a non-starter and a concession that Canada is not prepared to make.

“They’re trying to get us to agree to a quota system, which we’re not going to do, because it’s ridiculous,” said the source.

 

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BONOKOSKI: Death knell beginning to toll for Trudeau Liberals

The 2019 federal election—coming exactly a year from this Sunday—does not look good for the Trudeau Liberals, with recent polls predicting the next government will be formed by Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives.

And it won’t even be close.

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