Category Archives: Japan

Canadian Single Dad Claims Harassment in Japan

I have zero sympathy for this man or anyone who goes to a foreign country and expects things to be run as they would in Canada. The Japanese regard time off of work as weakness. That’s how things roll. After working in Japan, he should have gathered that most of the globe doesn’t harbour the sentiments that Canadians do.

How is multiculturalism working out now?

The 47-year-old single father and former manager of global sales at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co. in Tokyo alleges he was harassed to the point of mental and physical collapse after he exercised his right to a leave when his son Alexander was born two years ago.

His lawyers have filed a temporary injunction against the Japanese brokerage and have asked a Tokyo court to order the firm reinstate him to full employee status. The company said it encourages its employees to take parental leave. But Wood said he’s a victim of what is known in Japan as patahara — paternity harassment.

Wood said he was incrementally demoted before he was put on unpaid leave in October after rejecting what he said amounted to a low-level clerical position and a more than 50 per cent pay cut.

“It was like junior high school girls’ type of behaviour — they shut me out,” he said. “They wouldn’t invite me to meetings, they wouldn’t look at me, they wouldn’t talk to me.”

Share

North Korea nuclear crisis: Japan bracing itself for influx of evacuees if war erupts

Japan is studying plans to cope with an influx of perhaps tens of thousands of North Korean evacuees if a military or other crisis breaks out on the peninsula, including ways to weed out spies and terrorists, a domestic newspaper said.

The Japan Coast Guard would escort boats fleeing North Korea to designated ports, where police would screen them by checking their identity and possible criminal records and expel those deemed a threat, The Yomiuri newspaper said on Thursday.

Share

Japanese PM Urges More Pressure Against North Korea

Asian leaders expressed mounting concern about North Korea’s nuclear weapons and missile development during a Tuesday meeting of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Japan, China and South Korea, with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe urging members to refrain from a return to talks with the isolated country.

According to a Japanese government spokesman, Abe told the other ASEAN Plus Three leaders that approaching Pyongyang for talks now would result in nothing meaningful, and that pressure must instead be applied until the North seeks dialogue on the basis that it will change its policies.

According to a draft of a joint statement seen by Kyodo News, the ASEAN Plus Three members were to urge North Korea to “stop provocative and threatening actions, thereby creating conditions conducive for dialogue.”

They were expected to call on North Korea to immediately comply with all relevant U.N. Security Council resolutions and reiterate their support for the “complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner.”

Share

Ever since 2011, sales of adult diapers in Japan have outpaced those of baby diapers.

8 signs Japan is a demographic Time Bomb

Japan is dealing with what economists call a “demographic time bomb.”

Through a vicious cycle of low fertility and low consumer spending, the country’s economy has gradually shrunk over the last 25 years.

People are living longer, and they’re heaping greater social-security costs onto younger generations who aren’t having kids to replace them — thereby furthering the cycle.

Share

The Mystery of Why Japanese People Are Having So Few Babies

TOKYO—Japan’s population is shrinking. For the first time since the government started keeping track more than a century ago, there were fewer than 1 million births last year, as the country’s population fell by more than 300,000 people. The blame has long been put on Japan’s young people, who are accused of not having enough sex, and on women, who, the narrative goes, put their careers before thoughts of getting married and having a family.

But there’s another, simpler explanation for the country’s low birth rate, one that has implications for the U.S.: Japan’s birth rate may be falling because there are fewer good opportunities for young people, and especially men, in the country’s economy. In a country where men are still widely expected to be breadwinners and support families, a lack of good jobs may be creating a class of men who don’t marry and have children because they—and their potential partners—know they can’t afford to.

Via This guy.

Share

What attracts Japanese women to ‘Islamic State’?

Japan has been shocked by reports that a handful of Japanese women have been detained in Iraq, apparently after travelling to the region to marry fighters for the so-called “Islamic State” (IS) – although there seems to be little sympathy for their plight.

Media reports from Iraq specify that more than 1,330 foreign women and children are currently being held at a camp for displaced people in northern Iraq. The foreign nationals, who according to the Associated Press were families of “IS” fighters, surrendered to Kurdish forces in late August after the “IS” stronghold in Tal Afar near Mosul was captured. The foreign nationals are believed to be from 14 countries, with Japan’s Shukan Bunshun news magazine reporting that five are Japanese citizens.

Share

Why Japan lost the Battle of Midway

From James Holmes at Real Clear Defense:

A devil’s advocate is a precious commodity. That has to be one of the takeaways from revisiting the Battle of Midway seventy-five years on, and it should be etched on the internal workings of any martial institution that wants to survive and thrive amid the rigors, danger, and sheer orneriness of combat. Despite Japanese mariners’ tactical brilliance and élan, the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) leadership was prone to such ills as groupthink and strategic doublethink. Worse, the IJN fleet was cursed to be led by Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto—a leader of such stature and mystique that subordinates deferred to him out of habit. Never mind whether his ideas concerning operations and strategy made sense.

As they sometimes didn’t. More.

Reality check: Precisely what our progressive betters want for us for our own good.

See also: Poseur Macron wrings handshake triumph out of Paris accord collapse
If that’s all the French have got, who cares what they think? Isn’t it over already?

Share

Take A Bite Out of Crime

No, really:

At around 2:50 pm on 23 May, three men ages 18 to 22 broke into a home in Utsunomiya, Tochigi. They then began assaulting the two 75-year-old women who resided there causing injuries. When violent invasion was all finished they ran off, taking with them a safe full of approximately 6.6 million yen (US$59,000) in jewelry.

Afterward, the trio were found by law enforcement in a car in Nikko City, about 50 kilometers (31 miles) from the scene of the crime. Tochigi Police gave pursuit in a helicopter as the fugitives tried to escape along the highway. In order to shake the chopper, they then ditched the car inside a tunnel on the highway and ran into the mountain forest.

And that’s when things went really bad for them.

As they ran through the woods the three men came face-to-face with a bear. And although they were tough stuff when it came to beating up elderly women, these thugs felt outmatched by the beast and quickly turned back the way they came.

However, in doing so they then came face-to-face with the 20 officers who followed them into the forest. Now trapped in a classic squeeze play, the trio realized that the choice between getting arrested and getting mauled to death wasn’t really a choice at all, and went with the police.

 

Share

The Falling Population of Japan

We’re not that far off:

Since Japan began counting its newborns more than a century ago, more than a million infants have been added to its population each year.

No longer, in the latest discomforting milestone for a country facing a steep population decline. Last year, the number of births in Japan dropped below one million for the first time, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare said on Friday.

The shrinking of the country’s population — deaths have outpaced births for several years — is already affecting the economy in areas including the job and housing markets, consumer spending and long-term investment plans at businesses.

Share

Muslim Creep

Japan has for centuries been a closed community.  They have shunned both immigration and emigration under what they call “sakoku”.  It is a ‘Japan for Japanese’ policy that is centuries old and is the reason that there are few minority groups with a population anywhere close to 1%.  In fact, all of the minority groups together make up less than 1.5% of their population.

It is easy to criticise this isolationism in a modern world where national boundaries are increasingly being eroded especially if you are a left-wing, global village adherent.  However, Japan has the advantage of being, perhaps the only sizable population that has not experienced any terrorism, including Islamic based attacks.

Share

100s of student snowflakes march in Tokyo against Japanese PM Abe’s plans to change pacifist constitution

Hundreds of people, mostly students, took to the streets of Tokyo to protest Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo’s intention to amend Japan’s pacifist constitution, local media reported.

Earlier in May, Abe announced plans to revise Article 9 of the Japanese Constitution, which forbids the state from engaging in wars as a means of settling international conflicts. It came into effect in 1947 after World War II.

Share

Cat Bento Boxes

When one reflects on one’s life, does one ever ask what is missing? Is it wealth? Meaning? A bento box in the shape of a cat?

If you said cat-shaped bento boxes, you’re in luck:

Offered by Tokyo-based Oriental Foods, these cat-shaped bento boxes measure 16.5 centimeters (6.5 inches) long and have two tiers, so that you can keep your rice separate from the rest of your lunch.

Share

Not welcome: Japan refuses more than 99 percent of refugee applications

It has been a decade since Liliane last saw her little girl. She fled Africa in fear for her life, leaving behind everything she knew and loved in the hope of a fresh start in Japan.

Today, she scrapes a living from dead-end jobs, and what Japanese she knows has been snatched from television shows. There is little government help for people like her: free language courses are limited, social housing is hard to find, discrimination is rife.

Yet Liliane is regarded as one of the lucky ones – she was granted refugee status in Japan, a country which refuses more than 99 percent of cases.

“It has not been easy,” she tells AFP, speaking under a pseudonym.

She adds: “Here they do not pay for your studies, they do not help you to get bank loans, or give you social housing… we are left to ourselves, we have to fight alone.”

Share