Category Archives: Islam

Why Is Female Genital Mutilation Still Happening in the U.S.?

Let’s be clear: FGM (female genital mutilation) is illegal in the United States. That fact did not stop Drs. Humana Nagarwala, Fakhruddin Attar, and his wife Farida Attar, from allegedly performing these criminal and human rights atrocities against two vulnerable 7-year-old girls in the Detroit metro area. The physicians and Attar’s wife have all been arrested. According to Fox 2 News in Detroit the three have been charged with female genital mutilation and conspiracy. The doctors are also charged with making false statements to investigators and trying to obstruct the investigation.

Up to 300 Brits are fighting with Isil and playing key strategic roles, says UK defector

As many as 300 Britons are still fighting with Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, a recent defector from London has revealed, amid growing concern the jihadists are plotting attacks on the UK.

Stefan Aristidou, 23, from Enfield, was arrested last week in the southern Turkish town of Kilis, three miles from the Syrian border, after surrendering to authorities.

Speaking in an interview before crossing into Turkey, Aristidou said there was “somewhere between 250-300” British Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil) fighters remaining – some in Iraq but most of whom are operating in Syria.

The Fruits of the Arab Spring Have Bore an Open Air Slave Market in Libya

Regime change was all the rage under the Obama administration — especially in the middle east. The pitch was MUH democracy needed to be exported to savage lands, whose populations were largely an illiterate ensemble of archaic tribes hellbent on blowing each other up over the interpretation of their fictional holy books.

Here was two time failed Presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton, flippantly opining about the fate of Libyan leader, Muammar Gaddafi.

“The Judeo-Christian Community”

Seeing Turkey’s election this month, in which the Turks used their democratic freedom to vote themselves out of their democratic freedom — just to throw it out — should remind us that the Judeo-Christian values which we take for granted are more fragile than we may have thought.

Shortly after the liberation of Iraq in 2003, the only way to get into immediate postwar Baghdad was to get a ride in Amman, Jordan, and take it across the desert to Iraq.

A bulletin board in Jordan’s Amman Intercontinental Hotel would list who was going to Baghdad and we all hitched rides with whomever we could get.

So, on a crazy trip, the well-known “Baghdad Dash,” three of us crammed into a tiny, not so cool-looking car and made our way across the desert.

Halfway, the engine stopped. In typical Mohammedan fashion, the driver said “Insha’ Allah” (“God’s will”), got out of the car and walked off.

Ethnic Slaughter in Bangladesh

Bangladesh anti-blasphemy rally 2015

The Bangladesh government at present is carrying out atrocities against religious and ethnic minorities. Some foreign organisations helped me to flee to safety in Germany after nine of my colleagues were hacked to death by extremists.

Unfortunately, all the minorities of the country are not as fortunate. Last year, the police themselves set fire to about 3,000 houses of minority people. Most recently, the Bangladesh Army killed Romel Chakma, an indigenous student leader. He was only 18 and had one eye. The army decided to pour Kerosene over his dead body and set it on fire.

The government forced the media to bury the news. It is different in Bangladesh; nobody cares about minority people anyway.

‘It feels like Groundhog Day’: US Marines return to Helmand province

When thousands of US Marines flooded into Helmand eight years ago, they demonstrated Barack Obama’s resolve to quash the Taliban once and for all and leave a peaceful province for Afghans to take over.

Two years after the US flag was lowered, however, the Marines are back, in a sign that things turned out rather differently.

“It feels like Groundhog Day,” said Staff Sergeant Robin Spotts, on his third Helmand deployment. About half of the 300 Marines who have arrived over the past two weeks have served in Helmand before. Even the flag raised in a ceremony on Saturday was the same, having been kept at the Pentagon since October 2014.

‘If we had politicians like Pauline Hanson in Iraq we wouldn’t have ISIS’: Imam backs One Nation leader in her calls to curb Muslim migration

A Muslim leader has spoken out in support of One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson, claiming there would be no ISIS in Iraq if there were politicians like her in the Middle East.

Imam Sheikh Mohammad Tawhidi, who has openly spoken out against ISIS and extremists, told Sky News on Sunday he agrees with Senator Hanson’s call to ban Muslims from entering Australia.

The Imam said he believes Muslim refugees should be stopped from entering Australia for a ‘period of time’ so the country is not ‘flooded.’

‘If we had politicians like Pauline Hanson in Iraq, my hometown, we wouldn’t have had ISIS come in,’ he said.

h/t Suze

Dozens of Yazidis enslaved by ISIS in Iraq set free

Thirty-six members of the Yazidi religious minority are free after nearly three years in the hands of so-called Islamic State (IS), the UN says.

They have been taken to UN centres in Dohuk in Kurdish northern Iraq.

It is unclear whether they escaped in Iraq or were freed, as the UN declined to give more information to avoid jeopardising future releases.

IS killed and enslaved thousands of Yazidis after seizing the northern town of Sinjar in 2014.

Europe: What Happens to Christians There Will Come Here

“I fear we are approaching a situation resembling the tragic fate of Christianity in Northern Africa in Islam’s early days”, a Lutheran bishop, Jobst Schoene, warned a few years ago.

In ancient times, Algeria and Tunisia, entirely Christian, gave us great thinkers such as Tertullian and Augustine. Two centuries later, Christianity has disappeared, replaced by Arab-Islamic civilization.

Is Europe now meeting the same fate?

In the Middle East, “Christianity is over in Iraq” due to Islamic extremism; in Europe, Christianity is committing suicide.

US deploys troops to stop fighting in Syria – between two of its allies

The US has reportedly sent troops to the border between Turkey and the autonomous Kurdish region of northern Syria, in an apparent response to a spate of Turkish assaults on Kurdish targets.

The Turkish military launched air strikes against targets in the three self-governing cantons of Rojava this week, and have followed up with artillery and tank assaults.

Houses and schools have reportedly been damaged in subsequent attacks, and a media centre was also destroyed.

Saudi Arabia’s ‘Lavish’ Gift to Indonesia: Radical Islam

Accompanied by a 1,500-strong entourage, Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz arrived in Indonesia on March 1 for a nine-day gala tour. He was welcomed warmly not only as the monarch of one of the world’s richest countries, but as the custodian of Islam’s two holiest cities, Mecca and Medina.

While appearing to be taking a holiday rather than embarking on an official state visit — the 81-year-old sovereign spent six days at a resort in Bali — the king had some serious business to attend to. In what was advertised as an effort to promote “social interaction” between Saudi Arabia and Indonesia — with His Majesty announcing a billion-dollar aid package, unlimited flights between the two countries and the allotment of 50,000 extra spots per year for Indonesian pilgrims to make the hajj to Mecca and Medina – it seems as if the real purpose of the trip was to promote and enhance Salafism, an extremist Sunni strain, in the world’s largest Muslim country, frequently hailed in the West as an example of a moderate Islamic society.

‘Europe’s dirty secret’: officials on Chios scramble to cope with rising tensions

On a clear day the channel dividing Chios from the Turkish coast does not look like a channel at all. The nooks and crevices of Turkey’s western shores, its wind turbines and summer homes could, to the naked eye, be a promontory of the Greek island itself. For the men, women and children who almost daily make the crossing in dinghies and other smuggler craft, it is a God-given proximity, the gateway to Europe that continues to lure.

Samuel Aneke crossed the sea almost a year ago on 1 June. Like those before him, and doubtless those who will follow, he saw the five-mile stretch as the last hurdle to freedom. “You could say geography brought me here,” said the Nigerian, a broad smile momentarily dousing his otherwise dour demeanour. “But it was not supposed to keep me prisoner.”

Warning… Guardian piece.