Category Archives: Africa

Understanding Modern African Horrors by Way of the Indian Ocean Slave Trade

On January 15, and well into the morning of the next day, terrorists affiliated with the Somali Jihadi group Al Shabab forced their way into an upscale Nairobi hotel and business centre, killing 21 innocent civilians. Kenyan authorities, with some help from Western allies, killed some of the terrorists and captured the rest. Al Shabab justified the attack by denouncing the Kenyan government’s participation with African Union forces in Somalia, which has been in a state of civil warfare since the early 1990s.

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Sub-Saharan Africa becoming new battleground against violent extremism as jihad ‘goes south’

Extremists are penetrating sub-Saharan Africa at an alarming rate, threatening states ill-prepared to deal with the resulting complex social and security challenge, western and African officials have said.

Islamic radical groups, which include Isis, Al Qaeda affiliates and homegrown movements such as Boko Haram, threaten the continent – despite recent defeats at the hands of African armed forces. The encroachment poses unique challenges for policymakers and officials of shaky governments struggling with limited resources.

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Trump Admin. to Slash Support for UN Peacekeeping Missions in Africa

The Trump administration plans to significantly cut U.S. support for United Nations peacekeeping missions in Africa as part of a broader strategy that seeks to better promote American interests on the continent, National Security Adviser John Bolton said Thursday.

Speaking at the conservative Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C., Bolton criticized “unproductive, unsuccessful, and unaccountable U.N. peacekeeping missions” that often lead to decades of U.N. occupation rather than conflict resolution.

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Global elitists: Africans will stop having huge families if we ‘perfectly educate’ them

The goal of eliminating extreme poverty is among the top priorities of the global community and is the first of the UN’s seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). But, according to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, progress toward reducing poverty is threatened by the presence of too many poor people, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Hooray! (The Religion of) Peace comes to yet another African country

As we all know, Africa is a complete hell-hole and pretty much all African countries are corrupt, worthless, impoverished sh*tholes. Moreover, in spite of the $250bn in development aid money that has been given to Africa since the mid-1960s, there are still not many signs of all the water wells and roads and hospitals and electricity plants and schools and suchlike that we in the West have paid for many times over. Yet most of Africa’s rulers have become billionaires.

h/t Marvin

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China raises fears of ‘new colonialism’ with $60 billion investment across Africa

Chinese President Xi Jinping on Monday pledged $60 billion in financing for projects in Africa in the form of assistance, investment and loans, as China furthers efforts to link the continent’s economic prospects to its own.

Speaking to a gathering of African leaders in Beijing, Mr Xi said the figure includes $15 billion in grants, interest-free loans and concessional loans, $20 billion in credit lines, $10 billion for “development financing” and $5 billion to buy imports from Africa.

In addition, he said China will encourage companies to invest at least $10 billion in Africa over the next three years.

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Letter from Africa: Complaining about colonialism makes us the victims

In our series of letters from Africa, Nigerian writer and novelist Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani looks at the backlash over a statement from France’s president in which he was accused of diminishing the effects of colonialism.

Emmanuel Macron’s remarks have provided Africans with yet another one of those attack sessions that we so thoroughly enjoy – an opportunity to reprimand our former colonial rulers who once paraded themselves as superior to us.

“60% percent of the Nigerian population is aged under 25,” the French leader tweeted during his trip to Nigeria.

“That’s 60% of the population which, like me, did not witness colonisation. We are the new generation. We are going to dispel prejudice by rebuilding a new future through culture.”

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Ostracised and fetishised: The perils of travelling as a young black woman

‘However, in Swaziland, I found the people and their activities to be quite familiar- so much so that I often grew bored. Yes, there are cultural differences, including cultural events that are unique to the region, but the day to day life of a Swazi closely mirrors that of those in the Western world.

Swazis are normal people with normal worries – people who think about school, getting to work on time, music, relationships and popular culture like everyone else.

The country, just like the US, is diverse. There are city people and rural people, the affluent and the less fortunate, the good, the bad, the lazy, and the hard-working. More importantly, through it all everyone manages to stay fully clothed and the spears stay tucked away. I wondered why this side of Africa was never shown.

But the biggest surprise was how I was treated. It wasn’t a warm embrace.

The Peace Corps had selected the community I would be staying with and the people there had been told to expect a US volunteer.

“When is the American getting here?” I was asked on arrival.

I am the American, I said. They were shocked. Just like I had images of what a typical African should be, they too had an image of a typical American. And that was not a 22-year-old black woman.

To them, I was a fake American. Some even suggested that I was a spy from an English-speaking African country. This is not an uncommon reaction to volunteers of colour. In addition to black volunteers, Asian, Latino, and Native American volunteers are sometimes greeted by disappointed community members who assumed that they would look different – that they would be white.

I completed my two years of service in Swaziland with the Peace Corps. Despite continual challenges that I faced there due to my race, I stayed – because being there meant that I was continuing to learn more about Swazis, as well as allowing Swazis to learn more about me. Following my time there, I travelled from south to north Africa, mostly overland, to further enhance my knowledge about Africa’s diverse cultures and people.

…I had been travelling around Asia since August 2017. Like many tourists venturing into communities lacking diversity, I’ve been used to being stared at, but the attention I received in India felt different.

The looks didn’t seem like expressions of curiosity. They seemed sinister and unwelcoming. When people (young and old) see someone with black skin they stare, point, laugh, make jokes, clear paths, run as if you are chasing them, and fix their face to display an overall look of disgust. Too many people were rude, incredibly childish and treated me poorly. When not being ostracised, I was fetishised.

One of the most pivotal experiences came when a middle-aged man asked me, innocently, about the sexual prowess of black people.

The whole thing is very interesting. Not necessarily what you’d expect from the title.

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A Shadowy War’s Newest Front: A Drone Base Rising From Saharan Dust

AIR BASE 201, Niger — Rising from a barren stretch of African scrubland, a half-finished drone base represents the newest front line in America’s global shadow war.

At its center, hundreds of Air Force personnel are feverishly working to complete a $110 million airfield that, when finished in the coming months, will be used to stalk or strike extremists deep into West and North Africa, a region where most Americans have no idea the country is fighting.

Near the nascent runway, Army Green Berets are training Nigerien forces to carry out counterterrorism raids or fend off an enemy ambush — like the one that killed four American soldiers near the Mali border last fall.

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Macron: Europe Entering Age of ‘Unprecedented’ Mass Migration, ‘Shares Destiny’ with Africa

“The migratory phenomenon we are facing will be historic,” declared the French president in a television appearance Sunday night, when he announced that “great poverty”, “climate change”, and “geopolitical conflicts” will see Africans flooding into Europe “for many years to come”.

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