Category Archives: Quebec

Quebec Judge Hears Bill 62 Arguments

 

Let the battle begin!:

A Quebec Superior Court justice promised on Friday to deliver a ruling as soon as possible regarding a request for a temporary suspension of Quebec’s controversial face-covering law.

Justice Babak Barin heard arguments on a challenge of the legislation, known as Bill 62, which forces people to remove face coverings when receiving or giving a public service.

Marie-Michelle Lacoste, a Quebec woman who wears the veil, as well as the National Council of Canadian Muslims and the Canadian Civil Liberties Association launched the challenge last week.

Lawyer Catherine McKenzie asked the court for a temporary suspension of the section of the law that forces public sector employees and private citizens to have their face uncovered when giving or receiving public services.

McKenzie argued the article in question violates the right to equality and freedom of religion, which are guaranteed by the Quebec and Canadian charters, and should be declared invalid.

She said the matter is urgent, given the significant impact on Muslim women who wear the veil on a daily basis.

McKenzie added the damages to those women would be irreparable.

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Inside The Secret Facebook Group Of Quebec’s Far-Right “Wolf Pack”

The church basement started filling up at around 12:30 on a snowy Saturday afternoon last January. Though not parishioners of this place of worship in Montreal’s east end, they had the zeal of the converted. Islam, they believed, was infiltrating the politics of both Quebec and Canada, encroaching on their way of life and ultimately setting the stage for Sharia law.

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Joined by faith, divided by custom: Muslim women argue for and against Quebec’s Bill 62

When Quebec passed its religious neutrality law in October, it whipped up a storm of discord centred around the bill’s constitutionality and potentially Islamophobic overtones.

If the bill survives long enough to take effect in July — Quebecers are already denouncing Bill 62 and calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to intervene with a court challenge — it will prohibit Muslim women who wear face veils from giving or receiving public services.

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Trudeau weighing options on Quebec face-covering bill after court challenge

In the wake of a court challenge against a controversial Quebec law banning people from wearing face coverings while giving or receiving public services, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the federal government is actively studying ways in which it might also weigh in.

Anyone need a translation as to what he really means?

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Trudeau “Not Impressed” With Quebec’s Explanation of Bill 62

I’m sure people stay up all night thinking of how to sway a former substitute drama teacher:

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appeared incredulous Wednesday at Quebec’s efforts to clear up confusion surrounding its law on religious neutrality, which is widely seen as targeting Muslim women who wear face veils.

The province’s justice minister said last week Bill 62 would oblige people riding a bus or the subway to do so with their face uncovered for the entire journey.

On Tuesday, however, Stephanie Vallee backtracked, saying only those whose fare requires a card with photo ID will need to uncover their face before riding public transit — and that they can put the veil back on once they’ve been identified.

Asked specifically in Ottawa about Vallee’s clarifications, Trudeau replied: “You call those clarifications?”  

Yes, Justin, she does, because she is an educated Westerner in what should be a First World Western country that eschews the eradication of identity based on how girlish one is.

His efforts to appear to be in charge only underscore his impotence and pandering.

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Quebec’s new religious neutrality law offers a special level of hypocrisy: Neil Macdonald

Today, under the gaze of Jesus Christ suffering on the cross, Quebec’s governing Liberals stood as one and voted into law a “religious neutrality” bill forbidding anyone granting or receiving government services – which includes riding a bus or subway – from wearing a face covering.

As one, the opposition parties stood and opposed it, not out of concern for freedom of expression, but because the bill didn’t go far enough. It didn’t ban turbans and the paraphernalia of other religions from the public square.

Whiny blithering anti-Christian dolt.

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