Category Archives: Saudi Arabia

Ottawa looking into case where Saudi fled sex charges after embassy posted bail

HALIFAX — Federal officials are looking into how a Saudi man may have fled Canada while facing sexual assault charges, as legal experts suspect the Middle Eastern kingdom’s embassy played a key role.

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland told reporters in Sherbrooke, Que., on Thursday evening that it’s cause for concern when anyone skips bail while facing serious criminal charges, and said, “in that particular case we are looking into it.”

Lee Cohen, a veteran Halifax immigration lawyer, has said the likeliest scenario is that the Saudi embassy provided Mohammed Zuraibi Alzoabi with travel documents to leave, as his passport was being held while the 28-year-old awaited trial in Sydney, N.S.

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Saudi Arabia Rolls Out The Welcome Mat For Its Rapists & Child Porn Loving Citizens Facing Charges Abroad

Saudi man facing sexual assault charges in Nova Scotia ‘fled’ after embassy posted bail

A 28-year-old Saudi man charged with sexually assaulting a Cape Breton woman has gone missing, with a leading immigration lawyer saying it may be a case of the Middle Eastern kingdom helping a citizen flee while awaiting trial.

Nova Scotia’s prosecution service says Mohammed Zuraibi Alzoabi had $37,500 of his bail posted by the Saudi Arabian embassy last year in relation to the alleged sexual assault, assault and forcible confinement of the woman between Aug. 1, 2015 and March 26, 2017.

Saudi government helped 5 of its citizens at Oregon colleges flee the US after being convicted or charged with manslaughter, rape & child porn’

The Saudi government is accused of helping five students studying in Oregon flee the U.S. after they were charged or convicted of serious crimes including manslaughter, rape and possession of child porn.

The latest student, Abdulrahman Semeer Noorah, 23, is believed to have fled on a private jet with the help of his country’s consulate in June last year just weeks before he was due to stand trial for killing a 15-year-old girl.

Noorah’s case made international headlines last month following uproar over the killing of U.S.-based Saudi journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, who was murdered inside the country’s consulate in Istanbul in October.

Nuke Mecca Now.

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Women’s rights in Saudi Arabia: ‘I escaped to seek a better life’

It’s a dramatic story that has brought the restrictions faced by women in Saudi Arabia back into the spotlight.

Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun, 18, garnered global attention last week after she locked herself into her hotel room and refused to fly back home.

She was fleeing her family in Saudi Arabia and, after instigating a high-profile Twitter campaign, was granted asylum in Canada.

As the debate about women’s rights in the country continues, another young woman who fled Saudi Arabia for Canada has told her story to the BBC.

Salwa, 24, ran away with her 19-year-old sister eight months ago and now lives in Montreal. This, in her own words, is her story.

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Why a Saudi woman can be arrested for disobeying her father

Saudi Arabia drew international plaudits last year when it lifted a longstanding ban on women driving.

However, restrictions on women remain – most notably, the “male guardianship system”, a woman’s father, brother, husband or son has the authority to make critical decisions on her behalf.

These restrictions were highlighted in early January, when a young Saudi woman fleeing her family barricaded herself in a hotel room in Bangkok saying she feared imprisonment if she was sent back home.

Rahaf al-Qunun: Saudi woman pleads for asylum

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Thailand says it WON’T send Saudi teenager, 18, back to her home country after she barricaded herself in Bangkok hotel room to avoid being returned to family she says will KILL her

Thailand has said it will not send a Saudi teenager back to her homeland after she barricaded herself in a Bangkok hotel room to avoid being returned to family she fears will kill her.

Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun, 18, ran away from her family while they were on a trip to Kuwait three days ago and had flown to Thailand in the hope of reaching Australia to seek asylum.

But she has been at Bangkok airport since Saturday when she was denied entry by Thai immigration officials.

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Saudi woman is trapped at Bangkok airport after trying to flee family amid fears they would kill her for renouncing Islam

A young Saudi woman who says she has renounced Islam and could be killed if she returns home is trapped at Bangkok’s main airport.

Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun, 18, says she was on a trip to Kuwait with her family when she fled on a flight two days ago. She explained she tried to head to Australia, via Bangkok, to seek asylum but had her passport seized by a Saudi official.

Ms Rahaf claims that in addition to confiscating her passport, Saudi officials forcibly took her to the Miracle Transit Hotel at the airport, where she is being held until they take her home. Thai police, she said, had refused to help her.

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Did the Saudi Consulate Help Suspect in Fatal Portland Hit-and-Run Escape the U.S.?

Abdulrahman Sameer Noorah, a Saudi national who was in the U.S. on a student visa attending Portland Community College, was under house arrest in June 2017 after being charged in the hit-and-run death of 15-year-old high school sophomore Fallon Smart. But just nine days prior to his trial and despite wearing a U.S. Marshals Service GPS ankle monitor, Noorah vanished.

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He was accused of killing a Portland teen. Feds believe the Saudis helped him escape

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Abdulrahman Sameer Noorah and Fallon Smart.

A black SUV pulled up to Abdulrahman Sameer Noorah’s home in Southeast Portland two weeks before his June 2017 trial.

Noorah, a Saudi national charged the year before in the fatal hit-and-run of a teenage girl crossing Hawthorne Boulevard, had a bag packed that Saturday afternoon.

The private car drove the 21-year-old Portland Community College student to a sand-and-gravel yard two miles away.

That’s where Noorah sliced off the tracking monitor he had worn around his ankle for months, according to interviews with federal authorities. He then discarded it at the scene before vanishing, leaving a victim’s family crushed and prosecutors furious and flummoxed.

Law enforcement officials now say they believe Noorah got an illicit passport and boarded a plane — likely a private carrier — to flee the country.

Despite unknowns in the ongoing investigation, officials with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Marshals Service are all but certain who helped orchestrate the remarkable escape: the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

U.S. officials learned only recently from the Saudi government that Noorah arrived back home 18 months ago.

“We’re doing everything we can to get him back,” said Eric Wahlstrom, a supervisory deputy U.S. marshal in Oregon.

Prosecutors still hope to try Noorah in the death of 15-year-old Fallon Smart.

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General Dynamics warns Canada: Cancelling Saudi deal would cost billions

General Dynamics on Monday put pressure on Ottawa over the sale of armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia, warning that the Liberal government would incur “billions of dollars of liability” by unilaterally scrapping the deal.

The remarks by the Canadian unit of U.S. company General Dynamics — which one defence expert called unusual — reflect increasing tensions over a $13-billion agreement that is becoming politically awkward for the Liberal government.

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How events unfolded after foreign affairs minister sent tweet rebuking Saudi Arabia

…As officials were trying to come up with a communication strategy to put out fires, they were getting swamped by questions from national and international media. The foreign affairs department carefully monitored media publications and online reaction.

In one email from the minister’s office, a request was made to try and find any evidence of support from “like-minded” groups or countries.

Ninety minutes later, a staffer responded that that there was “very little” to be found in terms of online backing from other countries.

Canada’s back alright, good work Team Trudeau, no one was willing to take your side.

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Canada can’t afford to cancel the Saudi arms deal — and the Trudeau government knows it: Robyn Urback

It was Joseph Stalin who rather astutely observed that “one death is a tragedy; a million is a statistic.” That is as true today as it was during the heyday of the Soviet Union. Indeed, I suppose if anyone could credibly speak to our collective inertia toward mass execution, it would be one of the most brutal dictators of the 20th century.

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Canadian oil advocacy campaign deemed ‘discriminatory’ by CNW

A conservative political advocacy group has launched a TTC ad campaign urging federal politicians to ban Saudi Arabian oil imports.

With the campaign currently supported by radio spots, a mobile billboard and an ad-wrapped TTC streetcar, Ontario Proud founder Jeff Ballingall was surprised when CNW Group — a PR newswire service owned by Cision — refused distribution of their press release.

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Canada was courting Saudi Arabia for billions in new business before ill-fated tweet

The federal government was actively seeking billions of dollars in new business opportunities in Saudi Arabia last spring, opportunities that abruptly dried up with a single tweet issued in August by Canada’s embassy in Riyadh.

Briefing notes and other documents obtained by Global News show that Francois-Philippe Champagne, then the international trade minister in the Trudeau government, met twice with the Saudi ambassador to Canada last spring to pursue new export opportunities in everything from education to agriculture.

Many of the parties chastising Trump for being soft on the Saudis are only too happy to do business with Iran, China and a host of other ugly regimes.

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Big Media’s Power Games and the Khashoggi Affair

…Khashoggi’s murder, and the revelation that it had been committed on orders of the government in Riyadh, are a setback to the people of Saudi Arabia and their near-term chances for more constructive engagement with the rest of the world.

What I want to discuss, however, has mostly to do with the dishonest, hypocritical posturing by powerful interests that want to exploit decent people’s revulsion at the murder for dark and selfish ends that will not be conducive to human development and peace in the Middle East.

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