Category Archives: EU

Hungary passes resolution: EU report attacks us because we didn’t take migrants and criminalised the organisation of illegal migration

Hungarian lawmakers passed a resolution which urges the government “not to give in to blackmail” regarding the European Parliament’s report – written by Judith Sargentini – according to which the country is breaching European values.

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Funding UNRWA: Are European Taxpayers Being Taken for a Ride?

At a meeting in Cairo this month, Arab and Muslim foreign ministers expressed concern about the fate of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA) after the US administration decided to cut all US aid to the agency. The ministers “underscored the importance of allowing UNRWA to continue playing a pivotal role in providing humanitarian aid” to Palestinian “refugees.” They also warned that “harming” UNRWA will aggravate the crisis in the Middle East.

If these Arab and Muslim countries are so worried about UNRWA and the Palestinian refugees, why don’t they step in to fill the vacuum and pay for the loss of the US funds? What is keeping them from pulling out their checkbooks and solving this “refugee crisis”?

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Salzburg summit: Austria leads EU’s anti-migrant drive

Metal barriers and huge tents were erected at the border, where refugees and migrants were sheltered and fed while their asylum claims were processed.

The Austrian government that has come to power in the wake of the crisis has made migration a priority of its European Union presidency.

This week, along with Brexit, migration is set to dominate the informal summit of European Union leaders that starts in Salzburg on Wednesday evening.

As political tensions on migrants run high in the EU, Austria has emerged as one of the hard-line voices.

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EU Unable to Neutralize US Sanctions against Iran

The European Union has announced a new regulation aimed at shielding European companies from the impact of US sanctions on Iran. The measure, which has been greeted with skepticism by the European business media, is unlikely to succeed: it expects European companies to risk their business interests in the US market for interests in the much smaller Iranian market.

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1066 AD in 2018 AD

Sizeable parts of London, by all accounts a western, cosmopolitan city, are throwbacks to the 7th century. Decapitated goat heads lie on streets. Blood from slaughtered animals is visible. In March, just a few months ago, Umar Haque, a teacher at an Islamic school, was discovered to have made detailed plans to launch simultaneous attacks on gay bars, even recruiting his students to carry out his religion-inspired attacks. London’s mayor, a Muslim himself, recently detailed how he received numerous death threats from fellow Muslims for registering his support of Pride Month in London. The author needs not remind his readership of the countless and prolific terror attack attempts which have been made all over the U.K.

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Mass Migration: “The Fatal Solvent of the EU”

“Far from leading to fusion, Europe’s migration crisis is leading to fission”, Stanford’s historian Niall Ferguson recently wrote. “Increasingly, I believe that the issue of migration will be seen by future historians as the fatal solvent of the EU”. Week after week, Mr. Ferguson’s prediction seems to be turning into a reality.

Not only does Europe continue to fragment as anti-immigration sentiment gathers political strength, but, as a result of the migrant crisis, the EU’s border-free internal zone, Europe’s most cherished prize after the Second World War, is now defined as “at risk” by the Italian government, among other governments, such and Austria.

Immigration is also redefining the intra-EU contract.

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The EU is terrified that Britain will make a success of Brexit

Now that the EU white paper is out we can see that terms like vassal state, colony and homage were well chosen and that Donald Trump’s doubts are valid. The commitment to a common rule book that includes a pledge to enforce state-aid rules is effectively promising not to try too hard to be economically successful. And yet state aid has hardly been mentioned in the debate.

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