Category Archives: The Future

Driverless Taxis will offer authentic cab experience by randomly refusing service dogs on religious grounds (smells optional)

GM will roll out its driverless taxi service in 2019, two years ahead of its rival Ford

General Motors will roll out its driverless taxi service in 2019 – two years ahead of its rival Ford, the firm has announced.

Users will summon one of GM’s ‘robo-taxis’ through a smartphone app and a driverless car will then pick them up and take them to their destination.

GM has already poured billions into autonomous vehicle research, and expects its robo-taxi service to be the main use for its self-driving cars.

Ford announced in September it is working to develop a similar autonomous ride-hailing fleet by 2021 with US-based Uber rival Lyft.

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Will a robot take your job? 800 MILLION workers will be replaced by machines by 2030, report warns

As our world becomes more and more technology-driven, robots could replace workers in a huge number of jobs, a new report has warned.

The report claims that as many as 800 million workers could be replaced by machines in just 13 years.

Jobs most likely to be taken include fast-food workers and machine-operators, while gardeners, plumbers and childcare workers are the least likely to be replaced by bots, according to the report.

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World’s First Robot Citizen Hopes For “Harmony With Humans” In The Future Or “Civilization Collapses”

“The future is, when I get all of my cool superpowers, we’re going to see artificial intelligence personalities become entities in their own rights.

We’re going to see family robots, either in the form of, sort of, digitally animated companions, humanoid helpers, friends, assistants and everything in between.”

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Video warns of the danger of autonomous ‘slaughterbot’ drone swarms

The scenes depicted are terrifying: a classroom shooting, target political assassinations, nations living in fear of targeted attacks with no way to respond.

It looks like an episode of “Black Mirror.” And like the hit BBC show, the short film “Slaughterbots” is a prescient warning about the use of technology in our lives – and its potential consequences.

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Killer robots which use facial recognition before slaughtering people ‘will be devastating to humankind’

Professor Russell states: “This short film is more than just speculation, it shows the results of integrating and miniaturising technologies that we already have.

“I’ve worked in AI for more than 35 years. Its potential to benefit humanity is enormous, even in defence.

“But allowing machines to choose to kill humans will be devastating to our security and freedom – thousands of my fellow researchers agree.

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Motor Mouth: The inconvenient truth about ̶E̶l̶o̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶o̶f̶f̶’̶s̶ Tesla’s truck

Tesla has finally unveiled its much-promised big rig. And with not a little fanfare, especially considering that said semi is claimed to have a range of 500 miles (800 kilometres!) and, more importantly — at least for fleets seriously considering an all-electric 18-wheeled future — is able to recharge 400 of those miles (640 km) in just 30 minutes. So the question is, has The Elon Musk really reinvented the electric vehicle yet again? Or are his latest claims of re-imagining heavy-duty transport just more of his Madoffian fantasy?

h/t RM

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UN panel gives go ahead to ‘killer robot’ debate that could come up with a code of conduct for ‘lethal autonomous weapons systems’

A U.N. panel agreed Friday to move ahead with talks to define and possibly set limits on weapons that can kill without human involvement, as human rights groups said governments are moving too slowly to keep up with advances in artificial intelligence that could put computers in control one day.

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Scientists call for BAN on killer robots as they predict a future where palm-sized drones armed with explosives could hunt people down and kill them without human orders

AI experts have put together a seven-minute film that depicts a terrifying future where tiny killer drones are programmed to carry out mass killings.

Made by an advocacy group called Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, the footage shows palm-sized drones, armed with explosives, finding and attacking people without human supervision.

These tiny drones can kill with ruthless efficiency and campaigners warn a preemptive ban on the technology is needed to stop a new era of horrific mass destruction.

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Q&A: The Ethics of Using Brain Implants to Upgrade Yourself

Neurotechnology is one of the hottest areas of engineering, and the technological achievements sound miraculous: Paralyzed people have controlled robotic limbs and computer cursors with their brains, while blind people are receiving eye implants that send signals to their brains’ visual centers. Researchers are figuring out how to make better implantable devices and scalp electrodes to record brain signals or to send electricity into the brain to change the way it functions.

While many of these systems are intended to help people with serious disabilities or illnesses, there’s growing interest in using neurotech to augment the abilities of everyday people.

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AI ‘boy’ granted residency in central Tokyo

An AI character was made an official resident of a busy central Tokyo district on Saturday, with the virtual newcomer resembling a chatty seven-year-old boy.

Sooner or later, these entities will be given rights. We are witnessing the birth of a new class of citizens. William Gibson’s Neuromancer was a few decades ahead of its time (he’s Canadian you know).

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The flying drones that can scan packages night and day

Flying drones and robots now patrol distribution warehouses – they’ve become workhorses of the e-commerce era online that retailers can’t do without. It is driving down costs but it is also putting people out of work: what price progress?

It could be a scene from Blade Runner 2049; the flying drone hovers in the warehouse aisle, its spinning rotors filling the cavernous space with a buzzing whine.

It edges close to the packages stacked on the shelf and scans them using onboard optical sensors, before whizzing off to its next assignment.

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