Category Archives: Education

University launches ‘dream fund’ to help DACA students

The University of Minnesota is now soliciting donations from students and staff to help support illegal immigrant students with “at risk” legal status.

The new scholarship fund, known as “The Dream Fund,” is managed by the university’s Immigration Response team, which launched the program “to help students whose ability to pay for college may be affected by their legal status.”

It may also be affected by their being physically relocated to Mexico.

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What? “Woke” campus faces grubby money woes?

From Patti Zarling at Education Drive:

Colleges and universities throughout the U.S. are seeing a drop in enrollment in recent years, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Enrollment dropped by 4% from 2010 to 2014 in degree-granting institutions, and the agency says that from 2014 to 2025 the number of students under age 25 enrolling in college will jump 13 percent, compared with 18 percent for students 25 or older as the size of high school graduating classes grows smaller.

That means higher ed institutions likely will see a dip in income. In Oberlin’s case, a group of trustees tasked with examining finances found the prestigious school relies too heavily on cash from gifts, and does not presently draw enough funding from charging students for tuition or room and board. More.

Reality check: But maybe Oberlin isn’t teaching skills the world needs. Anyone remember the Oberlin Klan hoax of 2013?

The College Fix reported on Monday that Oberlin College, once named the 3rd “most liberal college in America,” was shocked by an alleged sighting of a “KKK figure,” wearing a robe and hood on campus.

Although there were no cell phone pictures or videos to corroborate the story, the “KKK figure” was reportedly spotted by someone in the early morning hours near the college’s African Heritage House.

Oberlin officials immediately cancelled all classes after hearing news of the alleged sighting.

Which turned out to be someone wearing a blanket.

If it really is hard to get people to pay to learn how to be useless and helpless, perhaps there’s hope after all.

See also:
An elegant whine against taxing endowments

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Conrad Black: Too many BAs. Too many lawyers. Not enough real work

Much of the advanced world is now creaking and groaning under the difficulty of finding useful employment or at least activity for the core of the population of traditional working age. For the first time, technological advances are increasing unemployment more than employment, and traditional business is generally less labour intensive with each innovation. The surge to service industry and other white collar occupations has been pronounced for decades. The trend was accompanied by a pandemic of socioeconomic snobbery that made it unseemly to have what was once called a blue-collar job. As mentioned in my piece here last week about some of the vagaries of contemporary education, the percentage of people with a university degree has skyrocketed, but the utility of the degree has deteriorated. When I gained a B.A. about 50 years ago, it was a virtual guaranty of employability, though I did not use it for that, and continued at university for some years, while beginning my newspaper career.

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‘One wrong just creates another wrong’: How the quiet transfer of teachers over disciplinary issues has led to patterns of abuse in schools

A new school and a fresh start.

For the teacher accused of sexually abusing his high school students.

For the teacher who told a high school girl her breasts should be “big enough for a handful and small enough for a mouthful.”

For the teacher who sexually assaulted a female co-worker in an elevator at the school they worked at.

Teachers in Ontario can be transferred after their school boards find reason to discipline them, and in some of the province’s largest boards there is no requirement to tell a new principal about the incoming teacher’s past, a Star investigation has found.

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‘Elitists, crybabies and junky degrees’: Education advocates see growing disdain for U.S. universities

COCHISE, Arizona — Frank Antenori shot the head off a rattlesnake at his back door last summer – a deadeye pistol blast from 20 feet. No college professor taught him that. The U.S. Army trained him, as a marksman and a medic, on the “two-way rifle range” of Afghanistan and Iraq.

Useful skills. Smart return on taxpayers’ investment. Not like the waste he sees at too many colleges and universities, where he says liberal professors teach “ridiculous” classes and indoctrinate students “who hang out and protest all day long and cry on our dime.”

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Tennessee: Nashville Middle School Students Visit Mosque for Religious Indoctrination

On October 17th, students from Metro Nashville Meigs Middle Magnet School visited the Islamic Center of Nashville (ICN) where Dina Sirois, operations director of the mosque, told them that they would “talk about beliefs and practices in Islam.”

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Back to work legislation in Ontario college strike expected to pass today

Ontario’s legislature is expected to pass a bill today that would force striking faculty at the province’s colleges to return to work.

The governing Liberals have made slow progress in pushing through their back-to-work bill because the New Democrats have refused to agree to speedy passage.

Fire every striking teacher and strip them of their teaching credentials.

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Video of Evergreen State Forum Reveals Students’ Disturbing Ideas

Evergreen State College is now firmly embedded in people’s minds. Why? Because the crybully students there were so incensed at a professor’s opinion that they had to shut down classes. The incident is a prime example of what the alt-left would make the entire United States look like if given the opportunity.

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Father of Autistic Son Displeased With School

Jeremy Piper of Quispamsis says there’s nothing inclusive about an education system that restricts his nine-year-old autistic son Alex to 30 minutes of class time per day.

Piper says the Department of Education has failed to equip its teaching staff and schools to support students with special needs and he’s convinced the students are paying the price.  

“They don’t have the resources,” Piper said.

“They don’t have the training. They don’t have the experience. And they won’t make themselves get it.”

Piper was reacting to what he describes as his son’s suspension on Nov. 2 from Quispamsis Elementary School over a series of violent outbursts, including one that may have caused serious injury to Alex’s educational assistant.

“This is their solution — send him home, don’t deal with it.” …

Piper said that until this month, Alex had no history of violent outbursts and had been going to school full time, with very few issues.

Alex started kindergarten at Milltown Elementary School in St. Stephen, where he was enrolled until last year.

Last year, Piper transferred to the Sussex RCMP detachment but chose a home near Quispamsis Elementary School because he had heard it was one of the best.

Piper shares custody of his two sons with their mother, who also lives in the Kennebecasis Valley.

Piper said Alex’s first year at Quispamsis seemed to go OK.

Then, about six weeks ago, he started hearing vague and conflicting reports about Alex acting violently and outbursts in the classroom.

The most serious complaint seemed to involve Alex’s educational assistant.

“So the first call I got said that Alex pulled his EA by the hair to the ground and she cut her knee,” Piper said.

“Then in our meeting two weeks ago, [Paul Smith, director of schools] said Alex pulled her to the ground by her hair so violently that she dislocated her knee, or pulled something in her knee and she’s going to be out for a number of months.”

Piper said it’s a real concern and that’s why he’d like to see the documentation, but it hasn’t been provided.

“I don’t know if it’s as bad as they say, or whether it happened because they won’t show me anything.”

According to Piper, Alex, who is non-verbal, hasn’t received the resources he needs to manage his behaviour and make the most of his learning opportunities.

Educational assistants don’t get nearly enough training to deal with autism, he said.

And after about 18 months on the wait list, Piper said, Alex has yet to be assigned a speech therapist.

Piper said he purchased an iPad for his son and he also paid for the $340 software that enables Alex to communicate with images and icons, but in the last couple of weeks he noticed it was coming home fully charged.

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