Category Archives: Culture Wars

Cool Detachment

Looks like a Manson family member at a parole hearing. Give me Paglia any day.

I still haven’t memorized my cell phone number, or my husband’s. I don’t remember the year my mother or father died, let alone the month and day. I can’t remember my wedding anniversary, either.

However, I’ve never forgotten that, sometime between the release of Annie Hall (1977) and Manhattan (1979), Woody Allen was the subject of a cover story in either Newsweek or Time in which—while musing bitterly about random, pointless suffering—he put in that cultural critic Susan Sontag’s cancer diagnosis “must have been particularly devastating for a woman of her sensibility.”

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Survey: Nearly Half of White, Working Class Americans Say They ‘Feel Like a Stranger in Their Own Country’

A poll released the Public Religion Research Institute and the Atlantic on Tuesday examining sentiments held by white, working class adults found that almost half surveyed felt that they had become “strangers” in their own country.

Overall, 51 percent of Americans think American culture has not changed for the worse since the 1950s, while 48 percent believe it has. Among the white, working class, 65 percent think it has changed for the worse, while 34 think it has gotten better. “Family values in general have gone to complete shit since the 1950s, [is] the best way to put it,” one female respondent said.

I suspect a similar result would hold true for Canada, certainly in it’s urban centres which are undergoing ghettoization.

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The Ivory Tower Man: Why Academia Hates Guns

There is a particular strain of humanity now deeply rooted in Western culture that we can refer to as the Ivory Tower Man. This individual is the product of an entire cultural philosophy. He is the result of several generations that have faced no immediate danger or challenge to life itself; he is the spawn of the Nanny State. The Ivory Tower Man is found throughout all current age groups and academia is especially rife with this character.

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“Sheeple” is now a Merriam-Webster word, BUT …

If Hill had won US 2016, would that have been the honoured word? We are informed via Mashable that it’s a new Merriam-Webster word for 2016:

If you’ve spent any time online, you know that “sheeple” is the word you use when you want to yell at an otherwise undefined group of people. It is the insult the blogging masses use to call someone a “dummy following a person or ideology without knowing why they’re following said person or ideology.” More.

As a rule, the Cool never vilifies the rest of us more honestly and earnestly than when we are acting to protect ourselves from the worst damage they can do.

See also: Mark Steyn on the doomed hillbilly

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Career Suicide

Dead chick.

Decades after dying by her own hand, a renowned female American poet makes the news. Sessions with her psychotherapist become public, revealing accusations of abuse and other sordid details of her already legendary life. Once more, critics and readers wonder: Was she a victim? A heroine? Or—was it possible—a villain?

If you guessed that I’m talking about Sylvia Plath, you’re only half right.

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No, ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Is Not ‘Unexpectedly Timely’

We are all necessarily prisoners of our own place and time, and thus, I was in my youth necessarily a fan of “The Handmaid’s Tale.” I read it; I discussed it very earnestly with like-minded friends; I copied author Margaret Atwood’s muted style and dystopian preoccupations in my own, less competent fiction.

But that youth has fled, alas; it has been two decades since I last waxed indignant about the drinking age, or picked up my copy of the book. Even that copy — paperback, dogeared and waterstained and threatening to come apart at the spine — has been left behind somewhere, presumably the same place I lost my velvet chokers and my Suzanne Vega CDs.

However, a new television show has been made out of the book, and is attracting rave reviews, less for its acting, script, or stunning visuals than for its “unexpectedly timely” message.

Nonsense.


According to the fever swamp left we have been living “The Handmaid’s Tale” since every Republican president.

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Did you know that there is Wrongthink science fiction?

From Bad Novelist:

The Wrongthink Sci-Fi Giveaway is about showcasing authors who have been marginalized by the gatekeepers of the sci-fi publishing industry for the sin of not complying with progressive social justice dogma. From Sarah Hoyt, who was accused of racism and ”internalized misogyny” for her association with the Sad Puppies campaign to reform the Hugo Awards, to Nick Cole, who lost a publishing contract for daring to write a story about an artificially intelligent computer who is troubled by abortion, these authors have faced smear campaigns, boycotts and blacklisting for failing to toe the progressive line. More.

Reality check: Bad novelist! Bad! You deserve plenty of readers.

Politically correct novels are an environmentally unfriendly form of litterbox liner.

See also: Marvel! Readers tire of partisan comics

and

Progressives go after art eventually too

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SNL couldn’t really joke re Obama

He is their Jesus. And those are Big Shoes to Fill.

From Christian Toto at Hollywood in Toto:

Comedian Jay Pharoah’s impression of President Barack Obama was spot on. Too bad so few people noticed.

Pharoah opened up about his time on the venerable sketch series during an April 13 chat on Hot 97’s “Ebro in the Morning” show. The comedian got fired from “SNL” in August, but his Obama character got his pink slip much earlier.

“For the last year and a half they did no Obama sketches at all. They just were like, ‘oh, we don’t know what to do…’ I said, ‘just let me do my characters and we’ll be fine.’ They didn’t wanna do that,” Pharoah said.

“SNL” became increasingly progressive during the Obama years. Few sketches skewered the first black president. The show’s writers ignored Obama’s considerable ego, his lofty pronouncements nor the fallout from the 2013 PolitiFact Lie of the Year – “If you like your health care plan you can keep it.” More.

Pharaoh’d hoped his 30 million views on YouTube would save him. They didn’t. One does not mock SJW Jesus.

Reality check: The inability to mock their own will be their undoing unless they can shut down alternative forms of entertainment. Watch for purse-lipped concern about “vicious, bitter” sendups of SJWs, virtue signallers, and other poseurs that “diminish our fragile national discourse.”

See also: Marvel! Readers tire of partisan comics

and

Progressives go after art eventually too

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The Danger of Ayn Rand

On the morning of September 11, 2001, I didn’t know the difference between National Review and The New Republic. (By all means, write your own joke…) I was groping for guidance, as I always had, in the written word, but my knowledge of lofty (and, I hoped, helpful) American political journals was restricted to Woody Allen’s line in Annie Hall that “Dissent and Commentary had merged and formed Dysentery.”

After getting properly oriented, I became curious about the evolution of U.S. conservative and libertarian publications, and basically inhaled George H. Nash’s The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945. Nash’s classic introduced me to what I think of as “the old, weird, other America,” that of The Freeman and Albert Jay Nock, anti-Communist folk music and Isabel Paterson.

 

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Liberalism’s Problem with Christianity

One doesn’t need to believe in order to understand the principles of early Protestant political ideas on liberty, the role of the civil magistrate and civil society. Yet, without the Christian faith as a foundation, liberalism will not help us live well together

Here in the West, we like to think of ourselves as liberals. Freedom for all, we say. Individual rights! is the cry heard from Poland to Perth. As liberals we understand society to be made up of individuals, and believe those individuals to be equal, with each possessing inherent moral agency. This equality and moral agency, we believe, mean that each individual possesses a set of basic rights enforceable by law. Our society and our political structures and practices are built upon this liberal ideal. Everybody is free, and everybody is equal. This, it seems, is our most basic political and social assumption.

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Why Progressives Hate Steve Bannon’s Cyclical View Of History

Progressives hate Steve Bannon’s fascination with a book that suggests history is cyclical. It undermines a progressive worldview that yearns for utopia.

If you want to make a progressive squirm, tell him that history is cyclical. Whether they realize it or not, progressives borrow their entire worldview from Christianity, and therefore have a fundamentally millenarian view of history. The idea of cycles makes them uncomfortable.

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Opioids and ‘the Good Life’

Lately there’s been a great deal of media coverage of the opioid crisis that is going on in the country. It is commonly referred to as a “‘disease’ along with alcoholism and drug abuse. This seems to be an egregious example of political correctness that disguises the real problem in the fog of a euphemism. Cancer is a disease, addiction is a spiritual problem. It is what happens when a society’s primary values are entertainment and pleasure rooted in materialism. And it represents the culmination of what secularism and liberalism have accomplished in their efforts to tear down all restraints to one’s conscience by destroying Christianity and biblical morality.

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Why Millennials Don’t Follow the Liberal Narrative

Perhaps they’re finding out how badly their Liberal-Left parents have screwed them over.

The standard narrative about today’s millennials is that they are unpredictable. They are very fluid and undefined. Despite this changeability, most people automatically assume that millennials are predictably liberal.

The facts, however, tell a different story. Researchers who study the habits and attitudes of millennials do not support this forgone conclusion. Indeed, liberal-minded people are finding these unpredicted results to be unsettling.

To liberals, millennials are free to be unpredictable as long as they are not conservative. That is why they are irate when the find millennials holding positions they are not supposed to be holding. On some issues, they are actually more traditional than their parents. 

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