Category Archives: China – Uyghur Muslim Unrest

All roads lead to China: 17 Arab countries join Beijing’s new Silk Road – but what about the Uyghurs?

Beijing has inked cooperation deals on its multi-trillion-dollar Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) with 17 Arab countries, state-run Xinhua News Agency reported, citing the results of a joint Sino-Arab forum.

The second China-Arab Forum on Reform and Development, which was held in Shanghai on Tuesday, attracted more than a hundred businessmen, politicians, and academics from China and Arab states, including Egypt, Lebanon, Djibouti, and Oman. This year’s meeting, dubbed ‘Build the Belt and Road, Share Development and Prosperity’, was dedicated to boosting the project.

I guess those Arab nations know something we don’t when it comes to China’s Uyghurs.

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Racism, Concentration Camps, Police State: Is China Set To Become The Fourth Reich?

More than a million people, for no reason other than their ethnicity or religion, are held in concentration camps in what Beijing calls the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and what traditional inhabitants of the area, the Uighurs, say is East Turkestan. In addition to Uighurs, ethnic Kazakhs are also held in these facilities.

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China says 13,000 ‘terrorists’ arrested in Xinjiang since 2014

Chinese authorities defended their ongoing crackdown in the western region of Xinjiang on Monday, claiming they had arrested nearly 13,000 terrorists and broken up hundreds of “terrorist gangs” since 2014.

The policy paper issued Monday attempted to face down growing international criticism of what the United Nations describes as internment camps, apparently holding more than one million ethnic Uighurs and other Muslims.

The State Council, China’s cabinet, said the measures “strike the right balance between compassion and severity” in stemming the threat of Islamist militancy and called the camps vocational training centers.

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China Vows to Continue Crackdown Fueling Muslim Detention Camps

Officials from China’s predominately Muslim region of Xinjiang defended mass detention camps as necessary to fight terrorism and vowed to maintain the crackdown for a “long time.”

Local security policies had prevented a major terrorist attack in the region for more than two years, Xinjiang government chief Shohrat Zakir told a regional delegation meeting in Beijing on Tuesday. Even so, he said it was still too early to relax the campaign because separatism persisted in the region, which borders Afghanistan and Kazakhstan.

“The fight against instability, extremism and secessionism is long, complex and intense,” Zakir told the public question session, held on the sidelines of the annual National People’s Congress. “We can’t relax for a moment at any time.”

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China says ‘preventive’ work in Xinjiang detention camps should be applauded

China’s counter-terrorism and de-radicalisation efforts in its far western region of Xinjiang should be applauded for creating a new method of tackling the problem, a senior diplomat told foreign envoys last week.

China is stepping up its diplomatic outreach over controversial detention camps in the heavily Muslim region, inviting more foreign diplomats to visit as it seeks to head off criticism from Muslim-majority nations and at the United Nations.

The government says the camps are re-education and training facilities, and have been highly successful in stopping attacks previously blamed on Islamist militants and separatists, but rights groups say they are internment camps

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China’s hidden camps

On 12 July 2015 a satellite swung over the rolling deserts and oasis cities of China’s vast far west.

One of the images it captured that day just shows a patch of empty, untouched, ashen-grey sand.

It seems an unlikely place to start an investigation into one of the most pressing human rights concerns of our age.

But less than three years later, on 22 April 2018, a satellite photo of that same piece of desert showed something new.

A massive, highly secure compound had materialised.

It is enclosed with a 2km-long exterior wall punctuated by 16 guard towers.

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Muslims in China forced to ‘eat pork & drink alcohol’ at Lunar New Year dinners and are threatened with imprisonment if they refuse

Muslims in China’s far west region of Xinjiang are being forced to eat pork and drink alcohol at events during the country’s Lunar New Year holiday, residents have claimed.

Residents in the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture said they were invited to Chinese New Year dinners where pork and alcohol were served. Chinese officials threatened to send them to ‘re-education camps’ if they refused to participate, according to a report by Radio Free Asia.

Photos sent to RFA also showed a Chinese official in Yining city visiting Muslim households and distributing raw pork on Monday, the eve of the Year of the Pig. People were also forced to display Chinese New Year decorations such as red lanterns and couplets outside their homes.

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‘If you enter a camp, you never come out’: inside China’s war on Islam

The Luopu County No 1 Vocational Skills Training Centre is hard to miss. It emerges suddenly, a huge campus towering over hectares of farmland.

Outside the compound, surrounded by tall white concrete walls lined with barbed wire and surveillance cameras, a police car patrols while several guards carrying long batons stand watch. The centre, which straddles a highway, is bigger than most of the surrounding villages – about 170,000sq metres. A banner on one building says: “Safeguard ethnic unity.”

Half a dozen people stand on the roadside, staring at the buildings. No one is willing to say exactly what this prison-like facility is or why they are waiting on its perimeter.

Note – this is a Guardian piece.

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China passes law to ‘make Islam more compatible with socialism’ amid outcry over Muslim abuse

China has announced plans to make Islam “more compatible with socialism”, amid growing fears about a crackdown on the country’s Muslims.

Beijing is to introduce measures aimed at “the sinicisation” of the religion within four years, state media reported.

The move is likely to fuel concerns about re-education camps in China’s Xinjiang region, where a million or more Uighurs and other Muslim minorities are believed to be held.

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‘They want to eliminate Islam’: Pakistani men reveal how Chinese authorities seize their Muslim wives for re-education

China stole his property.

The last time Chaudhry Javed Atta saw his wife was over a year ago – the Pakistani trader in dried and fresh produce was leaving their home in northwestern China’s heavily Muslim Xinjiang region to go back to his country to renew his visa.

He remembers the last thing she told him: ‘As soon as you leave, they will take me to the camp and I will not come back.’

That was August, 2017. By then, Atta and Amina Manaji, from the Muslim ethnic Uighur group native to Xinjiang, had been married for 14 years.

I’m not seeing a downside. h/t Dr. J

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China Assigns Fake Relatives To Infiltrate Uighur Muslim Families As Spies

China’s Communist Party has assigned over 1 million government workers to become relatives in Uighur Muslim families in order to infiltrate and spy on them.

Beijing has deployed 1.1 million agents to Uighur households as part of the “Pair Up and Become Family” program, sold as a program of cultural exchange between the Uighur and Han ethnic groups, according to the party’s official newspaper. In reality, these ethnic Han government agents operate as spies against the Uighurs in their very bedrooms, living rooms, kitchens and other intimate spaces.

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Chinese city urges those ‘poisoned by extremism’, who follow conservative Islam to confess crimes

BEIJING (Reuters) – A city in China’s far-western Xinjiang region has ordered people who are “poisoned by extremism, terrorism and separatism”, in contact with overseas terror groups or act in a conservative Islamic manner, to turn themselves in to authorities.

Those who surrender to judicial organs within 30 days and confess to their crimes will be treated leniently and might avoid punishment, said a notice posted on Sunday on the official social media account of the Hami city government.

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China’s hidden camps – What’s happened to the vanished Uighurs of Xinjiang?

On 12 July 2015 a satellite swung over the rolling deserts and oasis cities of China’s vast far west.

One of the images it captured that day just shows a patch of empty, untouched, ashen-grey sand.

It seems an unlikely place to start an investigation into one of the most pressing human rights concerns of our age.

But less than three years later, on 22 April 2018, a satellite photo of that same piece of desert showed something new.

A massive, highly secure compound had materialised.

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