Tag Archives: Illegal Aliens

Trump Declares Dreamer Program ‘Probably Dead’

I swear, wasn’t it less than a week ago when we were all running around with our hair on fire because the press was reporting that Trump was selling us out on compromises with Democrats on illegal immigration?

Seriously, the popular media in America when it comes to anything political is as unreliable as Pravda.

Prospects for a bipartisan agreement to protect young immigrants from deportation and prevent a government shutdown later this week faded Sunday as key lawmakers traded sharp accusations and President Trump said hopes for a deal were “probably dead.”

Negotiators spent last week seeking a solution that would shield young immigrants brought illegally to the United States as children, including the roughly 800,000 who secured work permits under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program created under President Barack Obama.

But a tentative deal worked out Thursday by a small bipartisan group of senators crumbled in an Oval Office meeting in which, according to multiple people involved, an angry Trump asked them why the United States should accept immigrants from “shithole countries” such as Haiti, El Salvador and African nations over those from European countries such as Norway.

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U.S. Revoking El Salvadorans’ “Protected Status” could test Canada’s Asylum Contingency Plans

The federal government’s contingency plans for a new surge of asylum seekers at the border this winter could be put to the test with the pending U.S. decision on the fate of as many as 200,000 Salvadorans.

The Trump administration is on the cusp of announcing whether it will renew the temporary protected status that’s allowed Salvadorans to live in the United States without fear of deportation since 2001.

Their status expires in March, and with the U.S. ending what’s known as the TPS program for thousands of nationals from other countries in recent months, it’s likely Salvadorans are next.

The U.S. has argued the temporary nature of the program has been abused, and the conditions – like natural disasters or conflict – that had made it unsafe for people to return to certain countries have changed.

But that’s left thousands of people facing deportation to countries they haven’t lived in for years.

When asked what he’d do if he lost his TPS status, Salvadoran Carlos Reyes, 40, who lives in Long Island, N.Y., told Newsday that Canada was an option.

“One thing I know is I’m going to lose my job, and if I don’t have a job, what can I do? I don’t want to go there to El Salvador but I won’t be able to stay here,” he told the American newspaper this week.

“…There’s Canada, but I don’t know anything about Canada. My life and everything is here.”

Salvadorans represent the largest population covered by the temporary protected status program and the potential for them and other Central Americans to come to Canada was flagged in briefing notes by Canadian diplomats in the U.S. earlier this year, following a surge of Haitian asylum seekers showing up at the border.

The Haitians began arriving even before a final decision had been made on their temporary status and the surge – upwards of 200 people a day in the summer months – saw the Liberal government scramble to mount a response.

Both Spanish-speaking and Creole-speaking MPs, and the federal immigration minister, were dispatched to Florida, New York, Texas, California, and Minnesota for outreach to affected populations. As well, consulates in a dozen cities ramped up their own outreach efforts in local media and elsewhere to try to communicate the rules around Canada’s asylum system.

Challenges remain. As late as November, the consul general of Nicaragua in Miami was telling local media that Canada was offering immigration alternatives to nationals from that country whose TPS status had been revoked.

Meanwhile, would-be refugees continue to flock online seeking advice on how best to get to Canada from the U.S. via unofficial channels. They’re seeking those routes because of an immigration agreement between Canada and the U.S. that precludes people from filing asylum claims at legal border entry points.

The Canadian government is now trying to target those people as well, said Hursh Jawal, a spokesman for Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen.

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Ancient Mayan languages are creating problems for today’s immigration courts

A Mayan language interpreter, meets with Vinicio Nicolas, 15, outside the federal immigration court in Anaheim before Vinicio's asylum hearing. Vinicio speaks Kanjobal, the language used in his village in the highlands of Guatemala

A Mayan language interpreter, meets with Vinicio Nicolas, 15, outside the federal immigration court in Anaheim before Vinicio’s asylum hearing. Vinicio ONLY speaks Kanjobal, the language used in his village in the highlands of Guatemala

With the stakes so high, he wanted someone who spoke his native tongue. He had arrived in the U.S. just eight months before, and his English wasn’t good. But neither was his Spanish.

The language the 15-year-old needed an interpreter to wrestle with — for the sake of his future — was an ancient Mayan one called Q’anjob’al, or Kanjobal.

Before entering an asylum office in Anaheim, interpreter Aldo Waykam asked Vinicio how he was feeling: “Tzet x’i a kul?”

Watx,” the teenager replied. Good.

Spoken by almost 80,000 people in mostly rural municipalities in Huehuetenango, Guatemala, Kanjobal is common in places like Santa Eulalia — where Vinicio grew up — but rare everywhere else.

Mam, a Mayan language spoken by more than 500,000 people in Guatemala, ranked ninth in the top 10 languages spoken in U.S. immigration court last fiscal year. Quiché ranked 11th. Both surpassed French, according to the Department of Justice Executive Office for Immigration Review.

Five years ago, Quiché and Mam didn’t even break the top 25 languages spoken in immigration court.

Like most Mayan language interpreters, Matias does what’s called “relay interpreting.” That means another interpreter provides the English-to-Spanish translation while Matias translates from Spanish to Mam.

Although he speaks English reasonably well, he said he doesn’t feel comfortable enough to provide direct English-to-Mam interpretation.

“It has to be a perfect translation, and we’re talking about someone’s life on the line, including that person’s family,” he said.

Matias is a naturalized U.S. citizen (yet can barely speak English himself), but others who could do translation are in the country illegally and don’t want to get near immigration court. At times, the interpreter is working from a remote spot in Guatemala with spotty phone service.

L.A. Times Story

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Oops! That’s The Sound of A Narrative Imploding! – Central American Minors Turn Down Refuge in Mexico

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Because Mexican welfare sucks. Maybe Ted Cruz can entice them north by handing out some more soccer balls.

Despite being offered refuge in Mexico, Central American minors continue to travel north to the United States.

On Thursday, Human Rights Watch published a report which revealed that “less than one percent of the children who are apprehended by Mexican immigration authorities are recognized as refugees.” Between January and November 2015 Mexican immigration authorities detained 16,869 unaccompanied minors from the Northern Triangle (Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador). Of those apprehended, only 52 received refugee status, which means only 0.3 percent received international protection in the first 11 months of 2015.

In light of this information several questions should be raised. What credibility do these minors have to claim asylum when they reach the United States, after they cross through a country which offers them refuge? If these minors are fleeing violence in their countries, why do they choose to return rather than accept refuge in Mexico? The touted argument, “they are fleeing for their lives, so we must take them in”, certainly sounds less convincing after they forgo refuge in Mexico and further endanger their lives as they continue to the U.S. border.

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