Fool Me Twice: Shame on CAIR

“You can’t believe everything you read, especially if it’s scrawled across a restaurant receipt.”

That was the conclusion of at least one major media outlet after a Texas steakhouse waiter posted an image of a fake handwritten note on Facebook to convince Americans that racism “still exists.” But if you can’t trust everything you read on social media, how should readers respond when the nation’s largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy group nurtures the same unsubstantiated fiction?

With chapters in more than a dozen states, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) works to “promote a positive image of Islam” while defending Muslims “who have experienced religious discrimination, defamation or hate crimes.” Therefore, when 20-year-old Khalil Cavil claimed to receive a “No tip for terrorist” message from a customer in lieu of gratuity, CAIR’s activists and paid attorneys didn’t hesitate to publicize the encounter, promoting Cavil’s specious verdict that “this racism, and this hatred still exists.

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