Ninety-Six Percent of Border Crossings are Through Quebec

Oui:

Quebec continues to receive the overwhelming majority of asylum seekers in Canada, with 96 per cent of illegal crossings into the country so far in 2018 happening at its border with the United States, according to recent RCMP statistics.

The rapid increase in the number is spurring calls from politicians in the province and community groups for Ottawa to change an agreement with the United States they say is encouraging people to get into Canada outside official ports of entry.

Out of 7,612 people who crossed illegally into the country during the first four months of the year, 7,307 came into Quebec — 2,479 in April alone, a 32 per cent increase from March.

Manitoba and British Columbia received the remainder, with about 150 asylum seekers each entering those provinces so far in 2018.

The Quebec government said projections suggested there could be as many as 400 crossings per day this summer, compared to 250 in 2017.

 

Also:

Andrea Horwath wants Ontario to be a sancutary province.

The NDP said those exact words in a January 31, 2017 press release titled “Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath to Premir Wynne: Declare Ontario a “Sanctuary Province.”‘

Here’s what the release said about making Ontario a “sanctuary province”:

“Ontario can and must also step up and lead. In addition, I urge you to declare Ontario to be a sanctuary province. In recent years, cities like Toronto and Hamilton have shown tremendous leadership by making local services accessible to all residents, regardless of their immigration status. Now, our province must do the same. We must guarantee that services will always be accessible to everyone in Ontario.”

 

And:

According to a Global News report based on government documents detailing how Canada deals with returning ISIS terrorists, the government works to facilitate the return of the terrorists to Canadian territory, and has laws that aren’t crafted to successfully punish those who left our country to fight for an evil enemy.

The report casts doubt on whether returning ISIS terrorists will be charged, saying of those investigations “Often, they require evidence of an individual’s activity in foreign conflict zones, or rely on information provided by partners that we are not authorized to disclose in court,” according to the documents. “The RCMP also faces challenges in collecting digital evidence, including access to encrypted communications.”

 

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