Closing arguments in case of Montrealers charged with terror-related charges

Sabrine Djermane and El Mahdi Jamali each face three charges: attempting to leave Canada to commit a terror act abroad; possession of an explosive substance; and committing an act under the direction or for the profit of a terrorist organization.

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  • Mr. Meow

    All charges will be dropped, an official apology will be offered from the PMO for not examining the root causes of terrorism. The misunderstood Muslims will be offered re-integration and sensitivity training and a 10 million dollar cheque.

  • ontario john

    I’m sure little Justin can work it into his apology tour. Someone get him some kleenex.

    • Raymond Hietapakka

      …they really should have their own Federal Dept. and Minister to take care of their interests…

  • Raymond Hietapakka

    “Possession of Explosives for No Lawful Purpose” …last time I checked, a conviction could reward you with a maximum 14-year stretch in The Bucket….

    • Watchman

      Yes, but in their case they might claim possession of explosives is now a traditional muslim practice, a bit like a kirpan knife is to the Sikhs.

  • canminuteman

    If “attempting to leave Canada to commit terrorist acts abroad”, is a crime, then surely succeeding in leaving Canada to commit terrorist acts abroad is a crime. If this is the case every returning jihadi can be charged and jailed. Is it that complicated? The only thing I can think is that the government thinks that enough muslims support the jihadis that they don’t want to lose their votes by prosecuting them.

    • Watchman

      I suspect that the standards of proof might be very high to prove someone was going overseas to commit terrorist acts unless they had written down their plans. If they had said that they were going to Syria to be trained in building demolition work, then the Canadian state would have to prove that their training was a terrorist action or that they planned to use these skills in a terrorist act. Proof beyond a reasonable doubt is a high bar for conviction on this charge I suspect.

      • canminuteman

        You could be right, but I bet an awful lot of them would admit it if you asked them. They’re not that bright and they believe in their cause.