Immigrants Are A Huge Net Cost To Canadians

This article provides easy access to a powerful set of facts showing that immigrants are a net cost to Canadians rather than a net benefit.

These facts were researched and tabulated by Herbert Grubel, Professor of Economics (Emeritus), at Simon Fraser University, a rare critical thinker in academia who questions the economic merits of mass immigration. He understands well why so few are willing to speak out negatively about immigration, and why the academic establishment is packed with sheepish conformists.

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  • tom_billesley

    Spotted entering Erie Basin Marina is a makeshift float that has traveled across the lake with a Canadian refugee. US Border Patrol is working to capture this what is belived to be illegal alien from Canada. We have requested more info however both US and Canadian officals have declined to comment at this time.
    If you see any illegal Canadians please notify local authorities immediately.
    Must be a joke
    https://www.facebook.com/BuffaloOnTheBookFace/photos/a.360140201105882.1073741828.360129247773644/368521610267741/?type=3

    • I think they are serious.

    • Bless his heart

      I remember when people would cross and cross back and everyone behaved nicely and nobody really cared as everybody had behaved themselves.

  • Old Guy

    Economists Patrick Grady and Herbert Grubel reported the following.

    “At an estimated per-capita net fiscal cost of $5,329, the fiscal cost of immigration can be estimated to have risen to the $27 to $35 billion range in 2014.”

    Immigration and the Welfare State Revisited: Fiscal Transfers to Immigrants in Canada
    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2612456

    In comparison military spending in Canada is currently about $19 billion per year.

    Forecast Trudeau Government (Surpluses / (Deficits)
    2017-2018 ($28.5) billion,
    2018-2019 ($27.4) billion,
    2019-2020 ($23.4) billion,
    2020-2021 ($14.3) billion,
    2021-2022 ($18.8) billion
    Total………($112.4) billion

    To paraphrase President Trump: Canada’s problem “is not that socialism has been poorly implemented, but that socialism has been faithfully implemented.”

  • Liberal Progressive

    Nonsense! They didn’t think about all the jobs these people create in the welfare and public housing sectors of government as well as all the social services nonprofit that serve their many needs!

    • Observer

      You forgot about all the jobs they create in the policing.

    • Maggat

      Won’t be to long before every non immigrant or non civil service worker will have their very own civil servant to carry around, feed and clothe. A grand step towards utopia.

  • Sharkibark

    It takes a study to figure this out? And for people who aren’t sure about how much 112 billion is, it is the price of 220,000 average homes priced at $500,000.

  • DMB

    Thanks to mass immigration many Canadians find it increasingly difficult to afford to buy a new home. It’s great if you are the one selling a home and moving to a more affordable city but if you are a young family and want to own your home than your out of luck!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNXlSYeXh7M

    • Linda1000

      What I’d like to know is how are some of them bringing so much money into the country. I’m not just talking about wealthy Chinese business investors but there are so-called refugees from Africa walking into car dealerships in Calgary and paying cash for big SUVs. Also heard about Afghani women dripping in gold and designer duds showing up at the mosque. I guess this is on top of the expensive homes they buy or luxury apartments they can afford to rent.

    • Ottawa Eyes

      Don’t worry the governments have promised to build more housing. Refugees and recent immigrants get first pick of public housing and seniors homes over Canadians who have been on the waiting lists for over a decade.

    • PaxCan

      Canada’s economy has become beholden to the housing industrial complex since we don’t make anything useful anymore.

      It’s why we keep immigration numbers so foolishly high: to pad our otherwise underwhelming economy with housing and retail. It’s a trick other countries like the U.K. and China use to make their economies look robust as well.

      The question is without low interest rates can these immigrants afford the houses they live in? I don’t think so since they have to assume riskier mortgages than Canadians do to buy them.

  • PaxCan

    After looking at the data of the past fifty years even the OECD concluded immigrants are a “negligible” economic benefit at best.

    We also know immigrants remove $24 billion from the Canadian economy each year as remittances to their native countries. The Philippines is practically surviving on the money it’s overseas citizens sends back to it.

    All the economic gains generated by immigration is eaten up by the immigration industry (lawyers, consultants, social workers) and the immigrants themselves leaving nothing left for the rest of us. And the costs to us Canadians is not just monetary but culturally and socially as well.

  • bargogx1

    Well, I’m glad someone did a study that offers proof, but this should have been obvious to anyone with any common sense and not blinded by ideology or greed for cheap labour.

  • bob e

    cost be damned .. think of the diversity & inclusion ..

    • Dave

      And kabab shops!

  • Marius K

    Immigration like anything else can be good, bad or ugly. In general, migration of people in large numbers creates social instability

    • Alain

      There was a time when immigration to Canada was good even up to the very early 60s. There were no government handouts or special services or treatment for immigrants. Also the requirements for acceptance were reasonable and normal, such as a working knowledge of the language, a clean bill of health and NO criminal record. The applicant had to provide proof of all that on his own dime. Furthermore, one needed to show that one could make it on his own. Oh, and any landed immigrant who was convicted of a crime here was deported pronto. Most immigrants made it on their own and were successful, while a few could not and returned to their home country on their own. One last, but very important thing, was that preference was given to anyone from any of the British Commonwealth countries. One simply cannot compare the results of that time to what exists after all the above was thrown out.