US confirms airstrike killed al-Shabab commander in Somalia

MOGADISHU, Somalia — The U.S. military on Friday confirmed it killed a high-level commander of the al-Shabab extremist group with an airstrike in Somalia over the weekend, targeting a man blamed for planning deadly attacks in the capital of the Horn of Africa nation.

President Donald Trump earlier this year approved expanded military operations against the al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab, including more aggressive airstrikes and considering parts of southern Somalia areas of active hostilities. Al-Shabab is the deadliest Islamic extremist group in Africa.

A U.S. Africa Command statement said the strike on July 30 killed Ali Mohamed Hussein, also known as Ali Jabal. He is the highest-level al-Shabab commander killed this year.

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  • Maurice Miner

    That is so fucking sad.

    Drones are quite costly to keep aloft, don’tcha know?

    We need a more expedient (and cost-effective) means of subduing the Mohammedans.

  • Gary

    Oh no , is Justin now going to announce that he’ll take in 25,000 somali refugees .

  • tom_billesley

    Social Media devoting resources to blocking expressions of incorrect thought, but meanwhile …
    YouTube child protection mechanism ‘failing’
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-40808177
    …….. members of YouTube’s Trusted Flagger programme have told BBC Trending that the company has a huge backlog of reports, some months old, and that the company responds to only a small fraction of complaints from the public about child endangerment and suspected child grooming.
    One volunteer says that he made more than 9,000 reports in December 2016 – and that none have been processed by the company.
    A small group of Trusted Flaggers also grew suspicious about effectiveness of YouTube’s public reporting abuse page. Over a recent 60-day period, they used it to flag up hundreds of accounts which potentially violated the site’s guidelines.
    However, out of a total of 526 reports, they received only 15 responses, and the volunteers say the survey is emblematic of a larger problem with lack of child protection on the site.
    As for Facebook:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-39187929