The Left Sees A Need For A More Sophisticated Form of Book Burning

“Do you have the book Hillbilly Elegy?”
“Yeah, we should have a copy on the front table; let me grab one for you.”
“Is it any good?”
“…It’s sold really well.”
“I hear it’s so powerful and important, especially now, since, well, you know…”

Working at an independent bookstore in the Greater Boston area, I find myself having some variation of this conversation a few times a week. To be fair, bookselling, like any retail or service job, comes with its fair share of repetitions. For example, the sales pitch for our loyalty program is so ingrained in me that it comes pouring out in a breathless flurry of words. Such things are largely innocuous, a necessary (if not occasionally tedious) part of the job. But when it comes to the above conversation concerning J.D. Vance’s bestselling memoir, there is something a bit more personal at stake, viz. my moral objection to the book that has become, for conservatives and liberals alike, a means of understanding the rise of “Trumpism.” And while it’s easy enough to take this moral high ground, it comes into direct conflict with that old chestnut about the customer always being right…

So what can you do when a customer wants a book that you not only find objectionable but also believe actually dangerous in the lessons it portends amidst such a politically precarious time? If it helps, swap Elegy for any book that you find particularly insidious, whether it’s Atlas ShruggedThe Communist Manifesto, or The Bible. The question remains: without stooping to the level of crazed book-burning, does the bookseller’s role ever evolve past the capitalist exchange of money for paper and pulp? And are there meaningful ways to resist the continued sales of disastrous books?

All I can say is: Thank God for Amazon!

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  • WalterBannon

    DOUGLAS KOZIOL received his MFA in Cultural Marxism from Emerson College, where he currently indoctrinates children in the First Year Social Justice Program.

    • Norman_In_New_York

      Clerk in a bookstore may be the only job his college degree qualifies him for. Well, sort of.

  • moraywatson

    ‘So what can you do when a customer wants a book that you not only find objectionable but also believe actually dangerous in the lessons it portends amidst such a politically precarious time?’

    You mean a book like the quran?

    • Frances

      Notice he mentioned the Bible as being objectionable, but neither Mein Kampf or the quran. What pretentious drivel.

  • Hard Little Machine

    Drop him a note asking him to burn all books and kill the literate like Pol Pot would have.

  • “So what can you do when a customer wants a book that you not only find
    objectionable but also believe actually dangerous in the lessons it portends amidst such a politically precarious time?”

    Well, you could start by learning to write properly constructed English.

    “does the bookseller’s role ever evolve past the capitalist exchange of money for paper and pulp?”

    No. The clue lies in the word “bookseller”.

  • Maurice Miner

    If you go into a book-store today, head to the religious books section.

    Here, I will guarantee that you will find the Quran on the shelf directly ABOVE the Christian Bibles. This is done by Mohammedans visiting the store.

    For amusement, rearrange the setting, and indeed, hide the Qurans behind cooking books that involve bacon or pork recipes. Stand back, and observe your handiwork in safety.