In Burkina Faso, living with the risk of Muslim terrorism is the new reality

OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso (AP) — Gaetan Santomenna lost his wife, his 9-year-old son and his mother the night jihadists attacked his cafe in Burkina Faso’s capital before striking a nearby hotel.

Now a year and a half later, he’s reopening doors to the popular restaurant as a sign of resistance to the growing extremism in this West African country.

“Being afraid does not help you escape danger. You aren’t safe anywhere. That’s the madness,” he said, shortly before the Cappuccino Cafe was due to open to the public again Thursday.

“I owe it to my children, to my family, to all those who have left us,” Santomenna said. “To accept defeat would be to not pay homage to them.”