On the Korean Peninsula

A scheme defrauds North Korean defectors of their savings:

A few months after fleeing her destitute homeland for a more decent life south of the border, Park, received a tempting offer from a fellow defector: She could transfer money to her family in the North for a commission fee.

Haunted by memories of her three starved children and old mother living in Hyesan in the country’s far north, the 44-year-old Park eagerly handed over 20 million won ($17,800) to a broker — only to find out a month later that not a single penny had reached her family.

“It was all of my savings,” said Park, who arrived here several years ago and agreed to speak to The Korea Herald on condition her full name not be published.

“I had spent months to find this guy, but to no avail. It is just outrageous to think that other defectors like me would easily fall prey to this kind of fraud, getting their savings wiped out.”

In line with the constant influx of North Koreans here, the tally of their remittances is expected to be rising. As of March 2017, a total of 30,490 have resettled in the South, according to the Unification Ministry.

No official data on their remittances is available, however, given a government ban on South Koreans from wiring money to the North. The brokers sneak the funds through acquaintances, which is also illegal in China.

According to a 2016 survey from the Seoul-based Database Center for North Korean Human Rights, around 58.5 percent of 400 surveyed defectors in the South have sent money back home. Twenty-six percent, or 104, said they did so last year, with the average amount nearing 2.35 million won.

Scum.

 

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South Korean President Moon Jae-In pulls a Trudeau:

South Korea’s defense ministry began preparations for a full-blown environmental impact assessment on the ongoing deployment of the US THAAD missile defense system Tuesday, a ministry official said, a move that will inevitably delay its operation.

The move came one day after President Moon Jae-in personally ordered a thorough study on the environmental impact of the advanced missile shield, which, when fully deployed, will consist of at least six rocket launchers with 48 rockets designed to intercept aerial threats flying over the peninsula.

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  • Ed

    “South Korea’s defense ministry began preparations for a full-blown environmental impact assessment on the ongoing deployment of the US THAAD missile defense system Tuesday, a ministry official said, a move that will inevitably delay its operation.”

    Before drawing any conclusions, will the “assessment” also study the impact of no missile shield, no American protective umbrella? No? Pity.

    • Moon was for THAAD during the elections.

      What a difference a month makes.

  • Drunk_by_Noon

    What’s the environmental impact of a detonated nuke over South Korea?
    I’m tired of these asshats, let’s pull out completely of these shithole countries.
    It’s no skin off our knees if the Chinese own them again for the next thousand years.

    • South Korea isn’t a sh–hole.

      At least not before Roh Moo-Hyun Redux gets through with it.

      If there is any consolation, the South Koreans take political corruption very seriously (hence the need for a hasty election) and Moon has only five years to screw things up.

      By then, North Korea should not be too much of an issue.

    • canminuteman

      I think there are regular (or at least used to be) riots and demonstrations against the government by communist forces in Korea who want to be like North Korea. I don’t know what they think will be in it for them if that happens.

      • Many people are actually non-communist but there is a leftist stain.

        I meant strain.

  • simus1

    South Korean politics are a thin overcoat over a population noted for their suspicion and stubbornness in all things where change is involved plus their susceptibility to try to profit via corrupt methods to permit changes to occur. Much like Japan only with sharper elbows and tongues at work.