Real estate expert documents France “Coming Apart”

From Christopher Caldwell at City Journal,

[Christophe] Guilluy doubts that anyplace exists in France’s new economy for working people as we’ve traditionally understood them. Paris offers the most striking case. As it has prospered, the City of Light has stratified, resembling, in this regard, London or American cities such as New York and San Francisco. It’s a place for millionaires, immigrants, tourists, and the young, with no room for the median Frenchman. Paris now drives out the people once thought of as synonymous with the city.

Yet economic opportunities for those unable to prosper in Paris are lacking elsewhere in France. Journalists and politicians assume that the stratification of France’s flourishing metropoles results from a glitch in the workings of globalization. Somehow, the rich parts of France have failed to impart their magical formula to the poor ones. Fixing the problem, at least for certain politicians and policy experts, involves coming up with a clever shortcut: perhaps, say, if Romorantin had free wireless, its citizens would soon find themselves wealthy, too. Guilluy disagrees. For him, there’s no reason to expect that Paris (and France’s other dynamic spots) will generate a new middle class or to assume that broad-based prosperity will develop elsewhere in the country (which happens to be where the majority of the population live). If he is right, we can understand why every major Western country has seen the rise of political movements taking aim at the present system.

In France, political correctness is more than a ridiculous set of opinions; it’s also—and primarily—a tool of government coercion. Not only does it tilt any political discussion in favor of one set of arguments; it also gives the ruling class a doubt-expelling myth that provides a constant boost to morale and esprit de corps, much as class systems did in the days before democracy. People tend to snicker when the question of political correctness is raised: its practitioners because no one wants to be thought politically correct; and its targets because no one wants to admit to being coerced. But it determines the current polarity in French politics. Where you stand depends largely on whether you believe that antiracism is a sincere response to a genuine upsurge of public hatred or an opportunistic posture for elites seeking to justify their rule.

Guilluy is ambivalent on the question…  More.

Reality check: Except for the elite, globalization averages things. A step up for the immigrant busboy; a step down for the once-employed French deplorables. Then there is the fun, for elite virtue-signallers, of sneering at the latter group’s unhappiness.  And enjoying the thrill of a mild, containable panic over the possible return of fascism..

See also: How did “populism” become such a dirty word? A left-wing journalist offers some thoughts

and

Has everyone forgotten that the Obama campaign decided to desert white working class voters in 2012? So why are progressive mental basement dwellers still flooding the internet with nonsense about the alt right, fake news, and the Russians in US politics?

  • JoKeR
  • favill

    Charles Martel had a very effective way of dealing with these people you effete French ƒµcks!!! And the French Revolution had an extremely effective way of dealing with the “elite.”

  • Norman_In_New_York

    If you must visit Europe on vacation, skip Paris and go to Budapest. The food and wine are excellent, there are many historic sites to explore, the culture is first-rate and you can walk the streets in safety.

  • simus1

    As the horses said to each other when WW1 ended, “Hey, we are still alive, think of all the peacetime work that needs catching up now that the fighting is over”.