What Germany was like when the Berlin Wall was built

“No one has the intention of building a wall,” said Walter Ulbricht, head of the State Council of East Germany, at an international press conference in East Berlin on June 15, 1961. Less than two months later, at dawn on August 13, construction workers began stretching barbed wire across the roads to Berlin’s western sectors. It was a fateful day for the German people. For 28 years, the Berlin Wall would separate the city into east and west.

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  • “No one has the intention of building a wall,” And they obviously lied.

    You can say that about every fascist political move by Politicians throughout history:

    – “no one has the intention of legalizing abortion on demand”
    – “no one has the intention of legalizing euthanasia”
    – “no one has the intention of legalizing Gay marriage”
    – “no one has the intention of legalizing Gay marriage adoption”
    – “no one has the intention of teaching homosexuality to children”
    – “no one has the intention of legalizing polygamy”
    – “no one has the intention of imposing Sharia law”
    – “no one has the intention of stifling freedom of speech”
    – “no one has the intention of violating privacy rights”
    – “no one has the intention of violating religious rights”
    – “no one has the intention of _________________” (fill in the blank)

    The list goes on and on about the kinds of promises fascist progressive Politicians have made over the past 30 years that inspired people to trust them and vote for them — promises which they have systematically and intentionally broken. And people continue to vote for them. This sort of “sleight of hand” could not occur without people noticing unless it was with the cooperation of mass Media functioning as propaganda outlets and entirely infiltrated by progressive fascists. The slow “progressive” approach to absolute dictatorship.

  • simus1

    A Czech colleague once opined that the red fascism he grew up under was not such a burden for the everyday sluggard marching in to do his routine efforts decade after decade. But to a person with ideas, initiative, and lacking a network of senior communists prepared to back him in regard to his “political soundness”, it was a nightmare.
    Berlin was the easy escape hatch to the west for the expensively trained east Germans filled with bright ideas and only contempt for those stifling their progress.