‘RIP Harambe’

I don’t like that they shot the Gorilla but the video suggests it was the right thing.

  • Kathy Prendergast

    The best zoos have enclosures for dangerous animals designed to make it impossible for any human to get into them, and also designed with the animals’ needs in mind. The safety of the humans and the animals depends on this. Far too many zoo visitors display lower intelligence than the animals they’ve come to see. I would suggest the stupid parents of that child should be required to compensate the zoo for its loss, but the zoo is also to blame for not protecting its animals adequately. Didn’t an incident like this happen previously at the same zoo? They really need to get their s**t together. If they have to keep animals in captivity they at least owe that to them.

    • It is a shame.

      • Kathy Prendergast

        It will be traumatic for the other gorillas in the group too. They have strong family bonds, just like humans do, and will not understand what happened and why he isn’t there anymore.

        • Miss Trixie

          You make some valid points about zoos and their enclosure sensibilities concerning safety, except to note that it should always be humans over animals. Especially BABY humans.

          The little tyke could have been ripped to shreds within moments and although it “looked like” the gorilla was “protecting” him, the little tyke was in immediate life-threatening danger. “Traumatic” for gorillas? *snort*

          Thanks, Disney, et al, for years of programming, movies, and cartoons showing creatures with human characteristics, that animals are just like us, think like us and have feelings. Just like us.

          That’s what gets people killed.

          • Kathy Prendergast

            Pardon me for not snorting at the idea that non-human animals have emotions too. Higher primates like gorillas in particular react very strongly to the loss of another animal they are close too. They are highly social animals, which is why good zoos don’t keep them in isolation anymore but try to let them live in a social group that mimics the way they would live in the wild, or at the very least give them a companion. Obviously this doesn’t mean they’re not dangerous.The zoo and the boy’s parents were grossly negligent.

          • Miss Trixie

            Aaaaaaaaaand cupcake, you’re another reason why women should not be allowed to vote.

            *snort*

          • tom_billesley
    • kkruger71

      I agree with everything you’ve written, except for the last part. Just like any wild animal, of course it doesn’t look like he’s trying to hurt him; until it does. This is how most animal related deaths and attacks happen, people get lulled into thinking since it hasn’t hurt me/them yet, it’s not going to. Who’s to say that the second a zookeeper entered the enclosure that the gorilla wouldn’t start to feel threatened. Sad result, but if saving the kid is the number one priority, shooting the gorilla was the only certain way to ensure that.
      Frankly both the zoo, for not having a secure enclosure, and possibly the parents for leaving their kid unsupervised enough to get in, should receive punishment for this. Maybe the fines could go towards one of the many breeding/conservation programs trying to save gorillas.

      • Alain

        Yes, I never cease to be amazed at the profound ignorance of so many people today concerning nature/animals. I think this total disconnect from nature, our natural roots, has a lot to do with the increase in so much moonbattery. I encountered an otherwise intelligent mid-aged couple at a gathering at a local neighbour’s farm. The couple came from the UK years back and keep a small flock of sheep. They told me what they thought was an interesting story. They observed a black bear enter the pasture where it appeared to be trying to herd the sheep (their opinion). When the flock stayed in tight formation but keeping the same distance from the bear, the bear, probably either not too hungry or inexperienced, finally left the pasture. I explained to them that the bear was acting like the predator it is and was hoping for one animal to split and leave the flock at which point it would have gone into full attack. Also a hungry or more experience bear would have charged the flock forcing this to happen. From the expression on their faces, I doubt they took me seriously. They were convinced that the bear was just herding the sheep without ill intent. I would probably write a book of such experiences, but I made my point.

        • kkruger71

          It’s like people expect them to be cartoons, constant snarling and gnashing of teeth.

        • Miss Trixie

          Profound ignorance? Yup.

          I remember witnessing an accident between a large Harley Davidson and a black bear last summer. The rider collided into the bear at 100+ kph as it burst out of the bushes onto the highway. He left a lot of hisself on the pavement and as he laid there screaming in agony with what looked to be more than one broken bone on minced legs, witnessed shrieked and berated him for “hurting the bear!” “How could you hurt that bear?!”

          It was surreal but par for the course with the enviro-whacko mother-Earth-humans-are-evil sh*heads here.

          The driver lived but spent some time recuperating. Thank goodness.

      • tom_billesley

        Couldn’t they have dropped in some fruit at the other end of the enclosure to distract the gorilla while they fetched an anaethsetic dart gun?

        • kkruger71

          If they tried anything to save the gorilla they would be putting the kid at further risk, and if things turned out badly, people would be freaking out about how they cost the kid his life over an animal. They were in a no-win situation.

    • The Butterfly

      Don’t male gorillas kill all the children that aren’t their own?

      • Kathy Prendergast

        Yes, but they’re intelligent enough to know the difference between a human child and the babies of another male gorilla. They kill these babies (just like lions do, and many other male animals) after they oust or kill another dominant male from a group, so they can impregnate the females and not have to waste their energy raising and protecting another male’s offspring. It’s brutal but it’s a genetic survival strategy. In this sense, the presence of the other male’s infants is threatening. So male gorillas killing infants is a situational act that would make no sense for the gorilla in this situation. Anyway, I do understand why the zoo made this choice, just think it’s disgraceful that this was allowed to happen at all. The fallout from this will likely be as bad for them as it would have been had the child been killed.

  • The Butterfly

    Can’t tell what happened after the video of course, but the gorilla did not seem to be acting aggressively.

    • dance…dancetotheradio

      That’s why you’re a butterfly.

      • The Butterfly

        I’m a butterfly because I was born this way. Also I’m beautiful.

        • Maurice Miner

          OK, let’s just think rainbows and unicorns, and get along with all of God’s little creatures (including alpha-male 200 lb silverbacks) and I’m sure that Harambe would have played with the child, and patted it on the head, and returned it to it’s mother.

          Just like in the Lion King!

          Everything is awesome!

  • Sid Falco

    #GorillaLivesMatter

    It would have saved a lot of welfare to have thrown the parent(s – as if) in afterwsrds

    • Miss Trixie

      Italians in the shower?
      .
      .
      .
      .
      .
      Gorillas in the mist! 😀

  • mauser 98

    aboard a cruise ship years back heard some parents complain there was no net around open decks to stop their brats from going overboard

    why was i on a boat with rugrats?…to embarrassing to explain

  • dance…dancetotheradio

    My son jumped into a pool once and fell right down like a stone.
    I jumped in after him.
    Where was this kids father?

    • Kathy Prendergast

      Probably doesn’t have one; that’s why he’s a disobedient little brat.