The Political Animal on the Saturday slaughter

We pulled the plug on Twitter so that our American friend (the Political Animal) could weigh in for us on Saturday’s GOP primaries:

The republican establishment last night drank itself to sleep.

Donor annointed Sen. Marco Rubio won not a single contest out of four. Trump won the two most important races, Louisiana and Kentucky, while Sen. Ted Cruz won Kansas and Maine.

The story of the night was the vanquishing of Rubio, of the establishment.

I noticed no neocons on Twitter last night. In gambling, that’s called a tell.

The primaries next Tuesday and those on the 15th favor Trump and strongly disfavor Cruz.

Rubio was absent wholly from the political landscape.

Trump called for Rubio to leave the race, saying it was impossible for him to prevail. This had to gall particularly the Rubio consultants, who were fond of saying Trump was afraid of the field getting smaller.

Trump challenged the Republican Party to challenge him via a third party campaign. In that instance, he wondered aloud if he’d even bother to campaign.

That’s a refreshingly straightforward threat delivered on a fairly high order.

I’ve said for some time that I thought Trump would be the nominee. That didn’t change last night. What changed was: The last plausible belief that Rubio would be the one to take out Trump died all night long.

A two man race between Trump & Cruz is one Trump wins. The establishment knows this most of all.

Consequently, the death of Rubio in these races signaled they must resign themselves to a Trump nomination.

Political realignment seems to be an earthquake in controlled slow motion.

Reality check from Denyse: A book I’d recommend to readers – to help us understand all this – is Charles Murray’s Coming Apart, a magisterial study of the decline of the working class in the United States (but the decline is evident in Canada too):

The American working class isn’t clinging bitterly to guns and religion; it is letting go of everything that once distinguished it. That’s what American sociologist and recent wave-maker Charles Murray says in Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010, along with his essay “The New American Divide.” Despite the considerable evidence Murray offers to back up his thesis that the United States is dividing starkly into an upper and a lower class, it remains controversial (for obvious reasons).

I wrote that in 2012. Maybe it’s not so controversial now as then, in the light of the so-far-unstopped Trump candidacy. Speaking personally, I had resigned myself to watching the North American working class slide uneasily but surely into underclass status (Murray’s “Fishtown,” ruled body and soul by smug “Belmont.”) Like Britain’s has.

But it seems, being Americans, they have decided to fight. How long can this last?

Certainly, when dealing with nervous nellies (or nervous ninnies), I find myself pointing out: It’s not about Trump. It’s about whether the American aristocracy really owns the United States, whose inhabitants are serfs. Whether that aristocracy can prance around on the global stage, enriching itself off third world labour and then do-gooding abroad or “saving the planet” as it pleases, like Mother Angela Merkel–safely indifferent to the local outcome.

If this continues, legacy major media of all political stripes, ever obedient servants to the aristocracy in recent decades, are finished. They will have shown their weakness in the face of the constant, feedback-friendly commentariat of Facebook, Twitter, and private e-mail accounts. And as PR for the old way of doing things, they will try much harder to do something about the internet.

See also: The End of the Republican Party As We Know It (Our American friend)

and

Divorcing the Donorcrats: Free trade in the real world

  • Our political class is no different, Patrick Brown is now on the record that he will turn the Ontario PC’s into the Liberal Party’s Big Tent of lies.

    • That’s probably a good thing. It enables those who genuinely need a conservative party to just start one. But are Canadians up to it?

      • Depends on whether or not the RCMP has the resources.

      • Solo712

        The problem is conservatism does not sell in Canada as political philosophy. Since the start of the Confederation the Tories are electable only when the Grits’ corruption becomes too visible.

        • Cat-astrophe

          And in comes Canadaz Superstar, JT. He is only a distraction for the real work they have in mind…the desolation of Canada and turning it over lock stock and barrel to the highest donor, the very thing they warned the Con’s were doing.
          Force yourself to read excerpts of yesterdays article about His Majesty, but have a pail nearby…

          TORONTO — Justin Trudeau, the new, young prime minister of Canada with movie-star looks, is bringing his star power to the White House.

          The tall, dark-haired, 44-year-old scion of one of Canada’s most famous politicians was sworn into office in November. Within weeks, President Barack Obama granted Trudeau one of the highest honors the U.S. reserves for close allies: a pomp-filled visit with plenty of time in private talks and in front of cameras with Obama, who remains popular in Canada.

          Trudeau, accompanied by his wife, Sophie Gregoire, will be feted Thursday at a sparkly state dinner, the first of Obama’s final year in office and the first for Canada since April 1997.

          “Obama was delighted that Trudeau got elected,” said Nelson Wiseman, a University of Toronto political science professor, offering perspective on Trudeau’s speedy invitation. “They’re both liberals. They both like to talk the same kind of language.”

          Stephen Harper, Trudeau’s predecessor, is a conservative who held office for nearly a decade. His relations with Obama were strained over various issues, most notably the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline that would have run from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. After years of U.S. government reviews, Obama killed the project last year.

          Mar 5, 2015 BY Rob Gillies, Associated Press and Darlene Superville, Associated Press

        • Alain

          One must also recognise that in the past the Liberal Party bore no resemblance to what it later became. It actually stood for individual freedom and small government. The Tories of the past were also a very different breed. We are now reaping the fruits of cultural marxism that began in the 60s and infiltrated the whole education system resulting in almost total indoctrination. Still I believe that real conservatism if clearly articulated would sell in Canada.

          • dance…dancetotheradio

            I remained immune to the cultural Marxists despite being immersed in their toxic stew in school in the seventies.
            And I teach my kids the same.
            We were poor as dirt growing up.
            And when my Dad finally made some money I was already out of the house working crap jobs to support myself.
            My brother and sister stayed there until they were almost thirty.
            I have kids.
            They don’t and never will.
            I severed ties with my politically correct sister because she’s an infection I do no want my kids to acquire.
            And my brother is just a waste case.

          • Alain

            Glad for you but feel sorry for your sister and brother. I have friends whose families are much the same. My four children had to endure the same indoctrination, but thankfully it was like water on a duck’s back. The disappointing thing for me is that only one our of the four have any interest in politics, and he is the one living in the US. The three in Canada have very conservative views and opinions but have no interest in voting. I tried on that account but clearly failed.

  • Xavier

    Completely disagree. Rubio has a chance and is being kept in the race to 1) siphon support that would otherwise go to Cruz or Trump, and 2) be the nominee in an open convention. That’s the plan, anyway.

  • SDMatt
  • David

    Certainly, when dealing with nervous nellies (or nervous ninnies), I find myself pointing out: It’s not about Trump. It’s about whether the American aristocracy really owns the United States, whose inhabitants are serfs. Whether that aristocracy can prance around on the global stage, enriching itself off third world labour and then do-gooding abroad or “saving the planet” as it pleases, like Mother Angela Merkel–safely indifferent to the local outcome.

    For me, that about says it all.

    • The same holds true here. Prince Asshat has already sent several billions to the 3rd world to give himself an ego-boost.

      • dance…dancetotheradio

        Maybe he should send that money to the homeless shelters in Canada.
        Except he doesn’t give a shit about the homeless does he?

    • Maggat

      Include Canada in a bit late but, still in lock step.

  • PapayaSF