How U’s make a buck off creating helplessness

From Victor Davis Hanson:

Careerism often drives campus politics. If poor, minority or first-generation college students could obtain the traditional tools of success — English and mathematic literacy, acquaintance with American history and protocols, oral and written language mastery — they would succeed as individuals without need for the college industry of collective victimology that assumes a permanent lack of parity.

Employers and the adult world no longer equate a bachelor’s degree with proof of a well-rounded education. Yet chastised universities usually oppose any objective measurement of their effectiveness. They certainly want federally insured student loans, but they do not want proof of their competency through national exit tests, which might help ensure that all graduates leave college able to compute, read and write well. How odd that standardized tests are permissible to judge entering students but not to certify exiting ones.

In the past, there was a clear bargain. The university said, “Leave us alone to do our business that we know best, and we promise to turn out the best-educated and most inductive generation of American youth.”

Universities are now breaking their word. Students, if they even graduate (about four in 10 do not, even after six years), are not “universally” educated. Instead, they are the least prepared yet most politicized graduates in memory. Arrogance and ignorance are a bad combination.

Unless what the U needs to create is a self-assured urban mob, suited to a high-tech age.

The market is already sensing a void — and thus opportunity. Online degree programs proliferate. Private vocational and trade schools sprout up around college campuses. Even Ivy League degrees have become mostly empty brand names, like Gucci or Versace, that convey status and open doors but hardly guarantee that graduates are knowledgeable or inductive thinkers. More.

Reality check: Doubtless. But whether the U’s know it or not, they are in the business of providing education for a post-employment society

In future most actual education will increasingly be via MOOCs (massive online open courses), to which universities are irrelevant. The MOOCs may operate from current universities as from a platform but the universities of the precious little asshats are irrelevant to a MOOC’s aims.

See also: Will robots take all jobs? No. But a great many.

But who actually needs Millennials? Except for votes?

Will the junior jackboots of Asshat U finally get “justice”? (Yes, but read on … )