Film industry struggled in 2015, and no wonder

From Variety:

Many of the best films of 2015 struggled to find audiences on the big screen. It’s not that Americans have stopped splurging at the movies: ticket sales are projected to hit a record $11 billion this year. However, audiences were more inclined to brave the multiplexes for major tentpole entertainment like “Stars Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Jurassic World” or “Avengers: Age of Ultron” over small dramas or comedies. The golden age of television might be influencing consumer habits, too. Theatergoers want their money’s worth — in the form of special effects, explosions and A-list stars — when they make a commitment to see a movie.

If the trend continues, the industry will need to brace itself for major changes in the years to come. Although Sundance 2015 was a strong year for quality pictures, most of the titles that debuted in Park City floundered at the box office. The prestige fall movie season, typically a good time for indie and adult-oriented releases, proved to be equally cold: among the casualties were “Steve Jobs,” “Our Brand Is Crisis,” “The Walk,” “Freeheld,” “99 Homes” and “Burnt.”
More.

Reality check: The major change is that Hollywood is firewood, and not because of Bible belters picketing on the sidewalk, rewarding the stars with free publicity.

Rather, all the new high-tech special effects make blockbusters better now. Alongside which, fewer people actually care about the values that Hollywood defends, represented by “indie and adult-oriented releases.” That’s not because they reject the values, but because most people either live that way or don’t, but neither group needs pay to see a film about it.

Alongside which, fewer people actually care about the values that Hollywood defends, represented by “indie and adult-oriented releases.” That’s not because they reject the values, but because most people either live that way or don’t. ut neither group needs pay to see a film about it.

Hollywood triumphed over fire and brimstone. So? So now, g’bye.

See also: Culturally relevant, Religious Nones are the largest group in the US Democratic Party

It’s not about what people believe; it’s about Hollywood as such being technically and culturally obsolete, unless it wants to push sex with kids, cannibalism, the moral righteousness of FGM, or something else that would genuinely titillate the “adult” audiences’ sense of values. Aw, maybe not even then.

It’s anyone’s guess as to what the political impact, if any, would be. Progressive governments funding Hollywood, to preach their values?

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  • john s

    The fall season , adult oriented movies used to satisfy peoples, mostly progressives need for validation. We get that from the Internet now.

  • Blind Druid

    An interesting documentary I saw last year, identified 15 year old boys as being the main target demographic for Hollywood “blockbuster” movies. The more I thought about – the more it made sense. That, plus over-the-top CGI imagery, which has become very boring due to the absolute physical impossibility of most of what is depicted. All crap, and the Jews in Tinseltown have pretty much run out of new ideas.

    • There are plenty of goys in Hollywood who’ve also run out of ideas. Jews built Hollywood – and I’m very glad they did – but the idea that they run it today is greatly exaggerated.

  • canminuteman

    Just before Christmas I went to see “In the Hearts of the Sea” with my wife. We were literally the only people in the entire theatre. It was a good movie that I saw the trailer for more than a year ago and was looking forward to seeing it. It was a good movie, but it cluld have been better. I didn’t see any trailers or posters advertizing anything else that I will wait a year to see when I was there.