National Post comment editor Andrew Coyne sorta resigns but not really over election endorsement

Journalist Andrew Coyne has stepped down as the National Post’s editor of editorials and comment after what he called a “professional disagreement” over the paper’s endorsement of the Conservative Party in today’s election.

Coyne explained his decision in a series of tweets posted Monday morning, saying he resigned “to protect my reputation and to preserve my editorial freedom as a columnist.”

However, he said he will continue to write a column for the newspaper.

He’s a freakin Liberal… who cares?

3 Liberal Assholes

3 Liberal Assholes

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  • Drunk_by_Noon

    When did Andrew Coyne become a “journalist”?

    • Exile1981

      Journalist just means active member of the communist party.

    • WalterBannon

      When journalism stopped being journalism.

    • dance…dancetotheradio

      When did Andrew Coyne have a reputation?
      He’s a mortgaged whore.

  • AmicusC

    I like how its so bad for one news organization to make one biased call but its not bad for a government funded “news” agency to shill for the other two parties 24/7 whether there is or isn’t an election occurring.

    • Canada is a bad joke some days.

      • AmicusC

        its going to get worse after tonight.

    • Alain

      No, had they endorsed the Liberals, everything would have been peachy.

  • The Butterfly

    What’s a newspaper?

    • WalterBannon

      something useful as kindling when planning to burn treasonous liberals at the stake…

  • Clink9

    He’s one of Turdo’s bumboys. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out.

  • Yusuf_Al_Kafir

    Like a spoiled fucking child who defiantly says “I’m taking my ball and going home!”, but still hangs around waiting for snack time.

  • kkruger71

    For years I have been bothered with people referring to him as a conservative. The guy is a Liberal through and through, one of the last of the late 80s Red Tory/Blue Liberal gang that worked hard to make both contender parties in the same image on issues they cared about so that no matter who won they got what they wanted.

    • Alain

      Absolutely.

  • Shebel

    I used to like Andrew Coyne because I thought he was unbiased and neutral.
    Now -I don’t like him. One of us has changed—

    • The Butterfly

      I know I haven’t changed. I’ve always been a butterfly.

  • David Murrell

    This Andrew Coyne imbroglio is as hilarious as the dimwitted Globe and Mail editorial last Saturday. Coyne used to be something of a conservative years ago, when he appeared at Civitas and Manning conferences. But the once-respected writer spent too much time as an “At Issue” panelist, where he became “CBCed” sort of speak. He was always an elitist, and he felt at home hobnobbing with the CBC bigshots. He has pulled a Jonathan Kay, knowing full well all the big corporate bucks lay with the left-wing media cartel. Lots of Liberal money to be had, backing Trudesu.

    • Shebel

      That is all so very true.
      If you can be bought that easily then you were Never that serious.
      Now Coyne will tell the majority of the People what he thinks they would like to hear.
      Don’t you just hate it Andrew when the People have figured you OUT.

  • pettifog

    In the photograph, who’s the guy on our right?

    • David Murrell

      Coyne’s Liberal paymaster, perhsps?

    • Clink9

      Harpoonj Sad deeeky?

  • WalterBannon

    The Post would be wise to fire him

  • He seems to have taken a turn to the left. His website currently redirects you to a hard-core pro-Palestinian page and I understand he has endorsed the NDP for this election, at least in his own constituency. A few years ago, I would probably have pegged him as a neo-conservative. He seemed fiscally conservative and socially liberal, and supported conservative positions (such as that we should remain a monarchy rather than become a republic) but in a way that suggested that he did not really grasp the point. Maybe the shift has occurred gradually and I didn’t notice because I stopped paying much attention to what Coyne was saying years ago. Michael Coren’s full-blown defection to the left seemed rather sudden, in comparison, although oddly less surprising, perhaps because he had shown leftist tendencies (such as the wish to turn Canada into a republic) all along.