David Suzuki and Justin Trudeau Have Heated Words

Whither the love?

A heated phone call with Justin Trudeau led to David Suzuki calling the Liberal leader a “twerp” and Trudeau labelling environmentalist’s views as “sanctimonious crap,” Suzuki said Friday.

In an interview with Evan Solomon on the former CBC host’s new radio show, Everything Is Political: Campaign 2015, Suzuki said Trudeau called to speak about the Liberals’ climate change policy before it was released.

“I didn’t call Justin, he called me,” Suzuki said. “He wanted an endorsement and he wanted to tell me exactly what his program was.”

Suzuki took issue with some of the projects the Liberal leader has supported in the past.

“I said ‘Justin, stop it,’” Suzuki told Solomon. “‘You’re just being political. I know that you want to make headway in Alberta so you’re for the continued development of the tar sands, you’re for the Keystone pipeline, but you’re against the Northern Gateway. You’re all over the damn map!’”

The environmental scientist advised Trudeau about accepting the internationally agreed target for a two-degree rise in global temperature means that 80 per cent of the oil sands would have to stay in the ground.

Suzuki said Trudeau didn’t take the criticism lightly and the conversation turned sour.

“He said: ‘I don’t have to listen to this sanctimonious crap.’ I proceeded to call him a twerp. But I realized that he’s playing politics.”

 

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  • Actually they’re both right! Justin is in fact a “twerp”, and Suzuki’s environmentalist views are in fact “sanctimonious crap”.

    But let’s face it folks, the real reason Suzuki would never politically endorse Justin and the Libs isn’t because Suzuki is against the “politicization” of environmentalism. Quite the contrary, he is already an outspoken supporter of the NDP, in fact that’s why Revenue Canada revoked the Suzuki Foundation’s charitable status after the last Federal election — Suzuki appeared in an NDP campaign commercial!

    • andycanuck

      Darn! Beat me to it, Ricardo. 🙁

    • DVult

      For some reason I like each of them better for correctly determining that the other one is a completely useless charlatan.

  • andycanuck

    And they both live in multimillion-dollar houses!

    • And you beat me to that one Andy. Did you watch the French-language debate the other night? Justin went on and on about “evil” millionaires, and how Harper’s policies (e.g. TFSA’s, income splitting, etc.) only helps millionaires.

      As I sat there watching, I thought to myself, “hey wait a minute, there’s only one actual millionaire on that stage, and it’s Justin Trudeau!”

      I happen to have a TFSA. I also happen to be a former homeless guy — I lived on the streets of various Canadian cities for about 2 1/2 years — literally on the streets, rarely in the homeless shelters even during winter. It took a number of years, and some incredibly good fortune, to finally get a place to live and a bit of money in the bank for a TFSA. Very nice thing to have especially as I approach retirement with a pittance of a pension awaiting me. And I am by no means wealthy at this point — still living quite frugally, occasionally cruising the streets at night on “garbage day” to see what I can scavenge and repair to save a little money.

      But I guess I’m just one of those evil greedy millionaires with a TFSA. While Justin Trudeau happens to be the real voice of the poor.

      • Frances

        You’re right, Ricardojaime, TFSA’s don’t just benefit the really rich. Indeed, in the overall scheme of things, that $5,000 to $10,000 per year being sheltered, would be pin money to them. The people who benefit most, as far as I can see, are the seniors who have been careful all their lives and now have savings to help them through their final years. They’ve been really good in schlepping these savings into TFSAs, thus sheltering what little interest they get from the taxman. These aren’t the wealthy and not having to pay tax on the income from some of their investments is major to them.

        • Everyone Else

          TFSAs is a misnomer. Interest income doesn’t amount to anything, but shares in companies might actually make (or lose) money that wouldn’t be taxable. Problem is finding a bank or trust company hosting TFSAs that actually lets you buy shares (and not their own investment package like ING/Tangerine).

          • Frances

            True, Everyone, shares do better than GICs. However, I deal with a fair few seniors in tax season and – believe me – every penny counts for them. I rejoice every time I see a couple of missing T5’s and hear the explanation.

          • Waffle

            There are some pretty solid “widows and orphan” stocks out there that pay very nice dividends (about 4,5% before the dividend tax credit). CD’s pay virtually nothing and you have to tie your funds up for 18 months — stocks you can sell anytime. During the recent market turmoil, the w&o’s hardly budged.

          • Waffle

            They all want to push their own products, but you can open a “self-directed” RRSP and I’m sure a “self-directed” TFSA with either a bank or a stock broker. The banks and trust try to persuade you to buy their products or deal with their brokerage firm, but by law, they can’t be too aggressive about it.

          • Everyone Else

            I’d like to find an institution authorized to hold TFSAs that permits the purchase of shares. If you know of any “self-directed” TFSA please tell me.

          • Waffle

            I typed “self-directed TFSA” into Google Search and found this:
            http://financialcrooks.com/how-choose-self-directed-tfsa-brokerage-minimize-fees-costs/

            Looks as if you can open one at any of the big banks. Hope this helps. Good luck!

          • Thanks for the info. As people have noted the interest on standard TFSA’s is nothing to brag about. But the funds are secure, albeit flexible — if you move them around within the same institution it really doesn’t cost anything. And self-directed sounds like a good option for better interest.

            Optionally, there are high interest savings accounts that pay in the 6% percent plus range. Much more attractive, and likewise with no penalty if moved around within the same institution. Although not as secure or tax-free. But if you’re a low-income person in the first place I’m not sure if a high interest account would be a big issue anyway — even if you make a few thousand bucks it certainly isn’t going to be enough to put you in a higher tax bracket. Guess you’d have to ask an income tax person about the pros and cons of that. I’m new to this stuff.

          • Waffle

            Then be very, very careful. If you’ve finally gotten a bit of a stake, be careful with it. First of all, I do not know of ANY high-interest savings (in the 6% range!!) that is safe and secure. 35 years ago, there were outfits that advertised investments that paid higher than the usual interest — THEY WERE NOT SAFE and people lost money (but they sounded good). The ideal person for you to talk to who can discuss your options honestly (and without an agenda) would be a stockbroker, preferably a bit older, who is not chasing commissions. Chances are he (or she) has been there, has seen it all, knows the pitfalls and can relate to where you’re at and where you’re coming from.
            Subject: Re: Comment on David Suzuki and Justin Trudeau Have Heated Words

          • Everyone Else

            I wouldn’t trust a stockbroker. They make their money selling stocks and automatically think selling & buying is a good thing as it generates commission for them.

            I’ve gotten the best investment advice from an older accountant. He knows all the ins and outs of the tax implications, and has been nurturing his own investments over the years.

          • Waffle

            You’ll notice I qualified my remarks about stock brokers. Yes, the young and hungry ones want the commish (and so do some of the older ones), but in my experience, accountants know sh** about the stock market. Yes, a good one can save you money on taxes and help you read the financial statements of a company, but I would be kind of leery about getting stock advice from an accountant. My best advice is learn as much as you can by reading (the financial section is a good place to start) — read everything. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. There are no shortcuts. Sometimes it’s a good idea to follow your gut instinct — if something doesn’t “feel” right, maybe you shouldn’t do it (and vice versa).

          • Everyone Else

            I don’t think anyone knows anything about the stock market (and to the extent they do it’s reflected in the stock price). All the “brilliant” fund managers end up losing. It’s impossible to time buying and selling, and too much of the winnings are scooped up by those with insider knowledge. For instance, a few years back Harley Davidson took off. Everybody who supplied any component to them knew about it. That forest of suppliers were all perfectly legal insider buyers. Similarly, Pfizer took off with Viagra. All the urologists involved in the field trials knew it was happening and bought shares.

            I think investing boils down to figuring out your risk profile (with an accountant), finding a fund that invests according to your profile, benefit from their research, and buy from their 10 top investments, preferring the ones with low recognition, since most people flock to higher recognition shares that are slightly inflated for that reason.

          • Waffle

            Everybody has their own way of “playing” the market. I have learned from bitter experience not to take tips from anyone. The only time I ever made money on a tip, it happened to be from someone with “inside” knowledge (not a principal, but in the industry). Over the years I have learned my timing from charts. I am not a technician but charts are helpful — is it going up, down or sideways? Where is the support, the resistance? Through the school of hard knocks (I am a lot older and hopefully wiser now) I have learned not to get greedy and I watch fro the sidelines what I buy or am interested in (even when I had no money to invest) — I have 2 stock market programs on my dashboard so I watch what is going on all day. What do I watch? For me, the big one is the US/CDN$ xchange rate because a portion of my monthly income is in US$ and because the rate affects the profitability of Canadian gold producers whose costs are in Canadian$ but their revenue is in US$.
            Subject: Re: Comment on David Suzuki and Justin Trudeau Have Heated Words

          • Waffle

            I think volume is very important, especially if you don’t have inside knowledge. A build up in volume usually precedes a price move. When you’re watching volume, you’re looking for activity that is higher than the daily average. It can also affect the volatility rating. A free program I use is at ino.com. It gives you a variety of tools you can use. They are always pushing stuff that you can buy, but I take advantage of the free offers. Right now, I’m mid-way through a free 10-day trial. The Toronto Stock Exchange can also be accessed free (tmxmoney.com), Both sites have a 15 minute delay, but if you’re not day trading where time matters, it’s not a big deal. And Google is vital for looking up info,

          • Everyone Else

            I checked and CIBC only offers their own mutual funds, on which they skim off their annual fees.

            However, TD seems to allow direct investment in any shares at a cost for online trading of $10/transaction, which is a pretty good deal. So, thanks Waffle.

          • Waffle

            Yeah, you gotta watch those management fees — they can kill you. Personally, I would never buy an equity mutual fund. The only “unit” vehicle I would even think of would be the interest income units which cost $10 each and pay monthly. I think they are good for small amounts of investment capital, But due to the low interest rate climate the time to buy is not now (IMHO).
            Subject: Re: Comment on David Suzuki and Justin Trudeau Have Heated Words

          • Everyone Else

            I haven’t bought mutual funds in years, not even ETFs. If there’s a fund I like for some reason or other I look up their prospectus to find their top investments and buy some of the top few directly myself. I have no sympathy for the banks and investment institutions and don’t want to give them management fees that are all no-risk gravy for them. I’d recommend this to anyone who has at least $50,000 in investments, RRSP or otherwise.

          • Waffle

            Shrewd!

          • Frances

            I think it can be done through any investment firm, either through a broker or a service such as BMO Investorline.

    • BillyHW

      Correction, they both live in *multiple* multimillion-dollar houses.

  • Surele Surele

    “The environmental scientist” – no he is not. He was a biologist who specialized in fruit flies (nothing wrong here, after all he has a Ph.G in Biology and did work as a prof), but then he became a broadcaster and an activist. I can’t be sure, but did he produce any scientific work since joining CBC in the 70s? I mean, real scientific research? Anybody?…

    • mauser 98

      Kooki Suzuki was in university when Elvis was in the army

    • Minicapt

      According to Wiki: “… and was a professor in the genetics department at the University of British Columbia from 1963 until his retirement in 2001.”
      However, he began doing TV in 1970, subsequently radio, and thus he is unlikely to have blessed a laboratory as a scientist since.

      Cheers

      • Clausewitz

        When I want weather and climate advice, I look to the words of a pseudo scientist who makes his living groping fruit flies gonads.

      • Surele Surele

        Exactly.

        • DVult

          It is scientifically proven that the harder you squeeze the higher they sing,

      • mobuyus

        He was Canada’s foremost expert on the fruit fly.

    • JoKeR

      Yes, he proved that aluminum foil hats really do prevent the satellites the Reagan administration put up from beaming evil thoughts into your head!

      • mobuyus

        Suzuki is the tin foil hat that builds itself.

  • Frances

    If Justin really wanted to discuss climate policy with a scientist, he’d consult with Dr Tim Ball.

    • mauser 98

      Pony don’t want facts

  • BillyHW
  • DMB

    This is simply an clash of big ego’s. For the left there can only be one Saint either St. Justin Trudeau or St. Suzuki.

    • David Murrell

      Both belong in the church of the CBC.

      • WalterBannon

        you mean mosque of CBC

        • David Murrell

          Heh.

    • I say watch the sharks eat each other.

  • Alain

    Now that’s what I call a cat fight….