John Kerry: US to accept 185,000 refugees by 2017

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif before a meeting in Geneva

Trump could wrap up the GOP nomination and the Presidential election tomorrow by firmly coming out against this idiocy.

Trying to address the Syrian refugee crisis, US Secretary of State John Kerry announced Sunday that the United States would significantly increase the number of worldwide refugees it takes in over the next two years, though not by nearly the amount many activists and former officials have urged.

The US will accept 85,000 refugees from around the world next year, up from 70,000, and rising to another 100,000 in 2017, Kerry said at news conference with German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier after the two discussed the mass migration of Syrians fleeing their civil war.

Congressional approval is not required for the expansion of resettlement slots, though Congress would have to appropriate money to pay for the additional effort. Some Republican lawmakers have expressed concerns that Islamic State militants could seek to slip into Europe or the US posing as migrants.

In 2011, two Kentucky residents who had been resettled as Iraqi refugees were accused of being al-Qaeda members. They were convicted of terrorism charges after their fingerprints were linked to roadside bombs in Iraq. That led to a cumbersome reinvestigation process and new steps to screen refugees, a process that has been criticized as slow and bureaucratic.

Some of the 65,000 that came from Iraq actually were trying to buy stinger missiles in my hometown in Kentucky,” said US Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a Republican presidential candidate, in a broadcast interview. “So we do have to be wary of some of the threat that comes from mass migration.”

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