The difficulty of due process in the age of counterterrorism

“…In Canadian counterterrorism circles, there is a problem known as “intelligence-to-evidence.”

Government authorities often have a lot of information they do not want to expose in court. The Crown may have to abandon the case if a judge might oblige security agencies to disclose sensitive spying methods, such as a wiretap technique, an informant’s identity, or a foreign partner’s top secret file.

Nowhere in Canada has this been better represented than in the case of Adil Charkaoui…

The Canadian Security Intelligence Service had recommended he be kicked out as a top-level threat. He denied the accusation, but the CSIS dossier included allegations he likely attended an Afghan training camp and that significant terrorist figures jailed and interrogated in Morocco, Guantanamo Bay, and the United States recognized him. CSIS reports leaked to the media alleged he had been overheard talking about attacking passenger jets.

Yet, none of this could be called evidence…


 

 

And now this clown is a citizen…

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