Canadian Government Press Release: Super Visa hits super milestone

May 19, 2015 —Surrey— Over 50,000 of the popular Parent and Grandparent Super Visas have been issued since its December 2011 launch, as part of Phase I of the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification.

This multiple-entry visa is valid for up to 10 years and provides parents and grandparents with the flexibility of being able to visit family in Canada for up to two years without needing to renew their status.

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander announced this milestone at the Surrey-Delta Indo Canadian Seniors Centre, in Surrey, B.C., noting that the 50,000th Super Visa had recently been issued.

Parents and grandparents wanting to visit their families in Canada for a longer period of time continue to take advantage of the Parent and Grandparent Super Visa. Approval rates have remained consistently high since the launch of the Super Visa.

Quick facts

  • With close to 1,200 Super Visas being approved monthly, this remains one of Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s most popular programs.
  • Super Visa applications are processed quickly—with over 80 percent of all Super Visa applications processed in under three months.
  • The majority of Super Visa applicants come from India and China—with Philippine and Pakistan nationals also among the top users of the visa.

Quote

Canada has one of the most generous family reunification programs in the world. We admit more parents and family members than most other developed countries. With the Parent and Grandparent Super Visa, eligible parents and grandparents pay fewer status renewal fees and have certainty that they will be able to enjoy the company of their families in Canada for a longer period of time. Today we mark the milestone of 50,000 Super Visas approved since the introduction of the Super Visa program on December 1, 2011; with an overall approval rate of 82 percent. The Super Visa gives eligible parents and grandparents an opportunity to spend extended periods of time with their families in Canada and I’m proud to highlight today’s milestone in support of families.”

Chris Alexander, Canada’s Citizenship and Immigration Minister


Thanks a lot. No wonder I can barely find a doctor in Victoria. No wonder waiting lists for medical services are so long. A whole bunch of people who never paid a penny in taxes over their lifetimes are competing with me.

  • ontario john

    Oh good, Omar Kahdr can bring relatives over.

    • Couper

      I think they’re already here.

      • Rosenmops

        His grandparents might not be here yet!

  • occupant 9

    Yep, the elderly from the third world are ripe for care of all kinds … on our dime, while we wait in line.

    Thank you Mr Government.

  • Brett_McS

    Importing welfare leeches. The remarkable thing is that they seem to be proud of themselves.

  • Brett_McS

    I think K has pointed out that many immigrants immigrate in order to get away from their families (my mother certainly did). These are the type of people we want – those who want to make a new start – not those who want to surround themselves with their tribe.

  • P_F

    Super Visa holders are not entitled to any kind of govt. welfare including medical.

    That being said, I remember 6-8 years ago, just before they increased the immigration intake numbers to an all time record high of 300K per year, govt. was telling us that; “we need these immigrant desperately to continue with our medical programs. The Canadians are getting old and not enough people left in the work force to pay the taxes to run all those welfare programs. ”
    So, basically it was an outright lie to make us believe that more immigrants means prosperity & better welfare for our senior citizens. It has been proven time & again that overall new immigrants are a burden (in various ways Including financial & social) to the host society.

    • Alain

      Add to the excessive yearly intake family reunification bringing in immediate and big time users of our health care system without having contributed and it gets worse. Family reunification brought in by the Liberals needs to be scrapped or at least restricted to one spouse and dependent children.

  • k1962

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but when they were formulating this super visa option, I thought that I read that the elderly person coming to Canada had to have purchased health insurance. I was under the impression that we were not paying for their health care.

    • Brett_McS

      That would be consistent with a Conservative government. If it was a leftist one it would be open slather.

    • P_F

      yup, health insurance provided by some Canadian insurance company.

      • Alain

        Probably but no insurance company, Canadian or otherwise, sell policies based on charity.

    • Frau Katze

      Maybe you’re right. I don’t know. I was infuriated by their bragging tone.

      If that it is true they should have added it to the press release. Who are they trying to appeal to?

      The immigrants themselves? It sure sounds like it. A Ponzi scheme. Import a new electorate.

      Yet they likely vote left.

      • Linda1000

        My friend just came back from Vancouver yesterday. She was there in the fall of 2013 and couldn’t believe how much it had grown in less than two years. So many more condo buildings or construction every where and she said it seemed like two or three white faces out of ten Asian or non-white when walking on the streets. This is not a racist statement as my friend is “brown”. Lol

        • Frau Katze

          My nephew lives there…he has no chance of ever buying anything. It is not all bad to bring in wealthy immigrants but it wrecked it for “plain folks”.

          • Linda1000

            Agree, and many properties bought by wealthy “investors” remain empty. The BC gov’t does not want to make residency a requirement though.

        • k1962

          She’s right. I have 3 old houses behind me fenced off and ready to be torn down. They will be replaced with a 4 story condo. Driving in this city is going to be awful with all of the development. It already is awful. Thank goodness for the back road short cuts that they keep blocking off in an attempt to calm the neighbourhood streets.

        • Alain

          Before retiring I used to work at the Sinclair Centre on Hastings and commented to my fellow workers that when I left the building to go for lunch in the same area, I could have thought I was in Hong Kong. I wasn’t in the least anti-Chinese having some in my family tree, but the change in the population could not be missed. Then further out in the Fraser Valley where I actually live, it is mostly what people call East Indians here. There is not doubt that our government beginning under the Liberals has imposed on us what I call population replacement in lieu of true immigration as it used to be.

          • Rosenmops

            Yes, population replacement. I was born in Vancouver in the 50’s. I’m really glad I don’t live there now. It is like a foreign country and extremely crowded and expensive. Thanks Trudeau.

      • k1962

        It’s probably a way for the Conservatives to get more of the immigrant vote, I guess. It costs us less to have grandma and grandpa living here on a visa than as immigrants, especially if we don’t have to pay their health care costs. I found the idea of them buying health insurance before they came kind of odd though because the older you get the harder it is to buy health insurance.

        • Rosenmops

          You would think health insurance would be very expensive for them. I’m skeptical.

      • Rosenmops

        Even if they have insurance there is still a shortage of doctors and hospital space. The government is going to start floating old people out on icebergs at the rate things are going.

        • k1962

          As someone whose father-in-law has miraculously and successfully battled metastasized prostate cancer for 5 years, I know that it is costing the government (taxpayer) an absolute fortune to treat him and keep him alive. Doing this for every non-Canadian parent and grandparent would add a huge burden to our stretched health care system. I hope I am right about reading that the government will require them to have purchased their own health insurance.

          • old stock canadian

            yes. Its true

        • Frau Katze

          True. They shouldn’t bringing in elderly people period.

          • Rosenmops

            It is crazy. When our grandparents came to Canada they were young and they probably never saw their own parents again. No free health care or pensions in those days.

  • Xavier

    A whole bunch of people who never paid a penny in taxes over their lifetimes are competing with me.

    But that’s why they came!

    • barryjr

      You must be referring to provincial welfare recipients

      • Frau Katze

        I apparently did not realize they needed their own insurance. OTOH, if they’re broke, will they be turned away? In the U.S., no one was turned away when push came to shove in the emergency ward. Not sure how it works now.

        • Linda1000

          Doubtful, I don’t think Emergency Rooms are allowed to turn anyone away.

        • Backa Bock

          They must have insurance that is valid upon entry. However, what happens if they stop paying premiums once they arrive? Also, the insurance need only provide $100k of coverage… That’s far too low should someone have a stroke, heart attack or brain injury.

  • barryjr

    I thought it looked ok until I read the part about staying 2 years.

  • Maggat

    Thanks a lot, assholes!

  • Frances

    Conflicted on this one. Have a family member whose parent is an only child of a small family, and the grandparent is back “home” with only a cousin to help. Know this family member would truly honour all financial obligations should the grandparent be allowed into Canada; we would also welcome this person into our lives.

    The alternative would be that another Canadian citizen would be forced to leave Canada for some years to care for an aging parent back “home”.

    We’re not talking ‘welfare leaches’ here: the family would take on serious financial obligations.

    While we’re on the subject: has anyone looked seriously at the Old Age Security payments. Happened – this year – to have a couple of clients who were collecting CPP but not OAS: having been brought to Canada as children, they could not prove when they had arrived. Apparently neither a long history (for one person) of CPP contributions nor giving birth (for another – obviously female – person) in Canada some 40 years ago was adequate proof for the OAS czars. On the other hand, recent and properly documented immigrants easily get the OAS to which they are entitled based on their date of arrival. What is not said is that they are also entitled to the Guaranteed Income Supplement, which – for a lot of these immigrants – more than compensates for the reduced OAS. Those child immigrants – SOL.

    • Rosenmops

      We’re not talking ‘welfare leaches’ here: the family would take on serious financial obligations.

      I suspect their are going to be a lot of cases where people try to game the system.

      • Frances

        They already have. There was a court case some years ago when several Ontario families fought for the right to dishonour their obligation to support immigrant family members; said obligation being an important part of the sponsorship process. The judge ruled against the families, saying other Canadians should not be obliged to support these relatives.