CNN: Why Islam forbids images of Mohammed

“Left, ‘No Woman, No Cry,’ (1998); right, ‘The Holy Virgin Mary’ (1996), which caused outrage with its depiction of a black Madonna with her right breast replaced by a clump of elephant dung, surrounded by putti formed by images from pornographic magazines.”—photo caption, New York Times website, Oct. 31, 2014 (screen shot of photo above)

Violence over depictions of the Prophet Mohammed may mystify many non-Muslims, but it speaks to a central tenet of Islam: the worship of God alone.

The prohibition began as an attempt to ward off idol worship, which was widespread in Islam’s Arabian birthplace. But in recent years, that prohibition has taken on a deadly edge.

A central tenet of Islam is that Mohammed was a man, not God, and that portraying him could lead to revering him in lieu of Allah.

“It’s all rooted in the notion of idol worship,” Akbar Ahmed, who chairs the Islamic Studies department at American University told CNN. “In Islam, the notion of God versus any depiction of God or any sacred figure is very strong”…


CNN is missing the point. Who cares why?

The MSM is more than happy to ridicule Christianity. Quite apart from free speech considerations, it’s the double standards of the MSM that annoy me.   The elephant dung picture may have caused outrage, but NYT still has the image on display at the link.

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