Where US sees terror prevention, some Muslims see profiling

MISSION VIEJO, Calif. (AP) — Sameer Mohiuddin grew more confused by the second as panelists speaking at his Southern California mosque trumpeted a new national initiative to prevent violent extremism.

Mohiuddin, 39, is an American citizen, longtime Californian and a vice president at a technology company. His wife was born and raised in Orange County, and they have three children. Why, he wondered, do his family and others like his even figure into the conversation?

“Day in and day out we’re trying to build a community, saying you’re part and parcel of the American fabric. You are an American citizen. I raise my girls and say they have the same rights as others,” Mohiuddin said. “The fact is, when you’re going to come present a program and say it’s specially geared to prevent growing extremism in the Muslim community, you’re by default saying my community is more predisposed to extremism. It sets people off”…

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