John Robson: Confederate surrender at Appomattox

April 9 is the 150th anniversary of the Confederate surrender at Appomattox that ended the US Civil War. It’s a suitable occasion to reflect on the power of forgiveness on history and the poisonous impact of resentment. The fairly rapid reconciliation between North and South made the United States geographically one nation again with a couple of generations. But the bitterness white Southerners directed to their black citizens, including denying them effective citizenship, left the country horribly divided racially into our own day.

The series of 150th anniversaries of key Civil War events has received surprisingly little attention especially, it seems, from the White House, curious given the importance of a black president in ending the long racial nightmare. But it deserves our attention, both for what was achieved through forgiveness after Appomattox and what tragically was not.

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  • Dana Garcia

    True, Obama has very un-American attitudes toward US history.

    • He isn’t an American in the proper sense of the term.

      • mauser 98

        in any sense

    • He is not an American.

      Besides, why should pivotal events get in the way of golf?

  • Xavier

    There were great strides made in racial equality from the 60s to the early 00s. Then came Obama and Holder.

    • mauser 98

      LBJ Great Society many say caused this trouble

  • mauser 98

    The Northern War of Aggression

    • Minicapt

      DiLorenzo is an ‘economist’ whose history comprehension is severely and selectively truncated.

      Cheers

      • mauser 98

        Lincoln never said that?

        • Minicapt

          Context, dear boy, context …

          Cheers

  • simus1

    Emperor Barry is neither “black”, nor an Afro American, nor an American American. Once you are prepared to view him outside rather than inside those boundaries, he is an open book, or to be precise, an open front man/con artist.