Not in my Name: the ‘Joint UK Muslim Statement’ offers no progressive solutions

This is quite a difficult response to write, as I am guaranteed to be labelled ‘Islamophobic’. Both I and my organisation will receive a continuous stream of ad hominem attacks, most completely untrue, but peppered with elements that are publically believed, hard to disprove or irrelevant.

But regardless of how difficult this is, it is necessary because I think Wednesday’s joint statement, headlined ‘Muslim Community rejects the State’s criminalisation of Islam and condemns moves to silence legitimate critique and dissent’, is detrimental to integration, will worsen community cohesion and offers no progressive solutions to the challenging policy area of counter-extremism.

At best, the hyperbolic language – such as the claim that the UK has criminalised Islam and that the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act is McCarthyite – is negligent, as it perpetuates the myth that there is institutionalised discrimination against Muslims in the UK and that we don’t respect Freedom of Religion here.

At worst, it is nefarious, as it serves to shut down debate, for such charged language will put Britons off speaking out and will make them feel anti-Muslim for doing so. It pushes naïve followers of the signatories to buy into a victimhood narrative, exacerbating the polarising ‘them-and-us’ construct that is so intrinsic to the radicalisation process, and a key part of its escalation to violent extremism.


The comments are fun do give them a look;)

 

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  • winniec

    Islam contains a number of features that would not be tolerated if Islam were invented today: misogyny, cruel punishments, supremacism, calls for genocide and ethnic cleansing, anti-scientific obscurantism, religious intolerance, pedophilia.
    Muslims are gradually waking up to these problems and are experiencing growing discomfort, if not cognitive dissonance. The atrocities committed by ISIS show Muslims what authentic Islam looks like.