Canada’s Murdered Aboriginal Women: 90% Knew Their Killers

Marissa Semkiw of TheRebel.media tells you what the rest of the media is leaving out.

You’ve probably heard the horrible statistics by now: Between 1980 and 2012, nearly 1,200 aboriginal females went missing or were murdered, – every one an outrage.

But you may not know that 90% of these women were murdered by someone they knew — 50% by a relative.

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  • disqus_PwGxBXHn8l

    That’s why RebelMedia must survive. For the sake of all the people who cannot be helped if we cannot even be honest about what is happening.

    It is not an epidemic of “murder,” in the sense of Boko Haram ambushing a village.

    It sounds like an epidemic of domestic abuse that sometimes ends in murder.

    If we do not frame the problems accurately, we will not generate useful solutions. But dollars to donuts, politicians will find someone to throw money at in the meantime. – Denyse O’Leary in Ottawa

    • Alain

      Well statedé

      • kiwi

        Same down here even with all the millions the tribes have extracted from the taxpayers under the auspices of “The Treaty of Waitangi”.
        They pay no taxes because they designate themselves as ‘charities’.

  • ontario john

    Geeze don’t spread this around or they will want an additional hundred million dollars to study that aspect of it.

  • Exile1981

    CBC and others have been for years implying that it is white racists that kill most natives. This proves it’s anything but.

    I know a fair number of natives and they are good people but the stories they tell about some others on the reservation are pretty scary. I honestly think the reservation system is a bad idea but at the same time disbanding the reservations would destroy there culture and leave a majority of natives as a perpetual underclass; but the current reservations seem to be breeding grounds for domestic violence and drug abuse.

    I know there are bright spots though; there used to be a special school for native girls with babies in our town (we are close to a reservation) and the first year it opened they had 6 students and 5 of the babies had FAS and of those girls 1 went on to post secondary. By the 10th year it was open they had 50 girls and 1 boy (the mother of his child had dumped it on him to raise), none of the babies where FAS and over 50% went on to additional schooling after graduating high school. That is an amazing turnaround. I had a chance to meet the lady who set up that school and a chance to meet the students a couple years ago. They were an amazing group. Some of those kids did trades, others traditional university and a bunch went into teaching or early childhood programs. The founder has now retired after 12 years but if they keep it up they will in a couple of generations have changed the mindset of the young and then at least that reserve will be a powerhouse.

    I like to look at it this way when it comes to Aboriginals – It took nearly 2000 years of wars, and social ills to move europe from a hunter gatherer society to a modern industrial one. We have asked the Aboriginals to do the same thing in under 200 years. If you look at ireland they had the same sorts of issues with abuse, drugs and alcohol as the industrial revolution upset their lives, so it’s not unexpected that the same would effect Canada’s aboriginals.

    • disqus_PwGxBXHn8l

      I agree. The focus should be not on whose fault it is but how to understand and frame the problem, so we can look for actual solutions. But don’t expect people who make a living off the problem to see it that way – Denyse O’Leary in Ottawa

    • Minicapt

      The turnover happened in the period 1967 to 1973 here in BC. The community organisers showed up to ‘help’ the Indians reclaim their ‘traditional cultures’, and to educate them on the many ways the white man had used to destroy them, especially the residential schools.

      Cheers

      • Exile1981

        A lot of people got money out of the residency school settlement even though they had never attended one of them. They got it on the basis of racial memory of the trauma. Lots of people got like 60-70k pay outs and most of them were broke in under a couple of months.

        • Minicapt

          I had classmates living at the local residential school at the time. It’s amazing how well the bad stuff was being covered up.

          Cheers

          • Exile1981

            Long before the residency thing was big news there were older natives talking about the beatings they had gotten for talking their language at school and some of the other punishments that happened. Some of the stories of murders I have trouble believing especially after the pit of “children’s” bones in that one maritime school turned out to be animal bones from the kitchen.

            What bothered me was the grand children of the people who were abused getting payouts when they never attended the school and when there sole claim was that grandpa told me it was bad and that caused me trauma my whole life.

            It’s no different than those harvard kids demanding they be exempt from exams because of the trama of the michel brown verdict.

          • Minicapt

            Yes, they got the strap; the strap was in service in my elementary school. My father started school speaking no English; I do not doubt his rapid linguistic progress was assisted by ‘persuasions’.
            I am not aware of any studies which demonstrate that the treatments at the Indian residential schools was significantly different than at non-Indian residential schools.

            Cheers

          • Exile1981

            I remember getting the strap in grade 2 in a public school, that was in the 70’s.
            A lot of residency schools where run by nuns and they didn’t believe in pampering the child, of course my parents used to get the strap at home from my grandparents so I think it was more an era than a specific targeting of a population as far as the strap went.

            One native elder told me the nuns used to tie them to there beds at night to prevent them running away.

      • ntt1

        The Haida language was rescued by a German languages student who transcribed it. that mans wife introduced the felt button blankets that became a tradition. But large portions of the so-called traditions are reimagined or reinvented.

        • kiwi

          You could be talking about Godzone!

  • Ron MacDonald

    For years, the liberal media has implied they were victims of white males.

    • New Centurion

      Agreed. As tragic as this is, the spin put on this by native leaders is this whole situation is somehow connected to residential schools. That’s why they want public inquiry. They just need to suggest the link. And once it’s out there regardless of how tenuous, you know what’ll come next…the demands for more money.

    • Gary

      But where are these liberal progressive leftists over the deaths of children when the STATS show that the majority of the killers are women, and among that the vast majority are related to the victims.

      Having 2 mothers increases the risks for being killed. But somehow the Human Rights Commissions and Children’s Aid Society thought it was a good idea to let a child have two mothers via adoption or from the sperm bank where only one Mother is related while the father is unknown.

  • Maggat

    Damn, why won’t The Prime Minister meet with the chiefs, dump a ton of money on the problem…..so it an be kicked down the road. Again.

  • Hard Little Machine

    That’s probably true generally. For example the leading cause of death of women in the workplace in the US is….murder. By either someone they know or someone on a shooting spree.

  • Tokenn

    I would have been very surprised if anything else was the case. I suspect the current government is resisting the demand for a public inquiry into the situation because they _know_ what a horrific mess it will turn a light on, and equally know they’ll be blamed for the situation…all despite the fact that they really can’t do anything about it. I pray that the CPC will remain a majority government after the next election, but I’m quite sure that a Liberal or NDP government [fate forfend!] would shy away from looking too closely at the situation just as quickly.