Alberto Nisman committed suicide? Let’s kill that lie

Women protest while holding signs that read in Spanish “We are all Nisman, No to Fear,” referring to the death of special prosecutor Alberto Nisman, outside Congress in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. (photo credit: AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

Let nobody be fooled into thinking that the prosecutor who was about to testify against Argentina’s president chose to end his own life. And let nobody buy the second big lie now being spread: That the AMIA case has not been solved. It has. Iran was to blame

When I sat down Monday to write about the appalling death of the courageous Buenos Aires prosecutor who exposed the Iranian and Hezbollah orchestration of the 1994 AMIA bombing, I didn’t even mention the Argentinian authorities’ initial contention that Alberto Nisman had committed suicide, so insulting and ridiculous was the notion

A day later, however, and the preposterous idea that Nisman took his own life has become the Argentinian authorities’ dominant assertion. Let’s kill that lie stone dead. Alberto Nisman was no suicide.

(That he was forced to put a gun to his own head, a possibility left open by the Argentinian investigating prosecutor, is quite plausible, however. But that’s not suicide; that’s murder.)

I’ve just come back from a conversation with the Argentinian-born Israeli author Gustavo Perednik, who wrote a book last year about the AMIA case — “To Kill Without A Trace” — and was a good friend of Nisman’s. “It’s rubbish. It’s lies,” Perednik says briskly of the despicable suicide claim.

Perednik, who was in constant contact with Nisman and last met with him in Buenos Aires a month ago, notes that both Nisman’s personality and the timing of his death render the suicide notion beyond risible.

Nisman the man was a tennis-playing optimist who loved and enjoyed life, who spoke of his separation from his long-term partner a year ago as a “liberation,” and who was utterly dedicated to his work, notes Perednik. He was a man who firmly shrugged off death threats, was balanced, and focused, and decent, and fine…

…A second lie it’s important to nail as it is spread worldwide by journalists who ought to know better is that the AMIA case was never solved. Not only has Nisman been murdered, but his 10 years of work are being misrepresented, even obliterated. The AMIA case was emphatically solved, by Alberto Nisman…

Related: Officials: Argentine prosecutor died in locked apartment

The officials say this, but they might be lying, or they might be more clever: the Soviets used to specialize in faked suicides and the the locked-room scenario has been used before.  I read about a wave of faked suicides after the Alger Hiss case in 1948.  They were no amateurs.  Current events suggests the Russians have not forgotten devious ways to kill. 

Second related and a total joke: Argentina vows to back probe into AMIA prosecutor’s suspicious death

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  • David Murrell

    Funny, none of the North American media cartel are reporting this story. Oh, yeah, the terrorists involved were Muslim and the victims were Jewish. End of story.

  • Norman_In_New_York

    The official inquiry into Nisman’s death will be as successful as OJ’s search for the real killer.

  • Guy Bridgeport

    It’s more likely Mossad was involved than anything else

  • Howard_Rotberg

    Mantua Books, a Canadian publisher, had just released the English translation of the brilliant book by Professor Gustavo Perednik, chronicling the 10 year struggle for Justice by Nisman, when he was assassinated. This story is not just about Argentian and Iran and the trading of justice for oil, but it is a warning for all of us who do not take seriously enough Islamist terrorism and the paving of the way for Islamist conquest. The book is at: http://www.amazon.com/Kill-Without-Trace-Terrorist-Connection/dp/1927618037 or at http://www.mantuabooks.com/catalog/item/7865310/10043533.htm