Everyone says they’re Charlie. In Britain, almost no one is

Je suis Charlie indeed. This is the problem with placards — there is rarely enough room to fit in the caveats, the qualifying clauses and the necessary evasions. I suppose you could write them on the back of the placard, one after the other, in biro. Or write in brackets and in much smaller letters, directly below ‘Je suis Charlie’: ‘Jusqu’a un certain point, Lord Copper.’ Then you can pop your biro into your lapel as a moving symbol of freedom of speech.

Only a few of the British mainstream -national newspapers felt it appropriate to reproduce the front cover of the latest, post-murder, edition of Charlie Hebdo, which shows the -Prophet Mohammed (PBUH, natch) saying: all is forgiven. Nobody else was quite Charlie, although BBC Newsnight held up the front page very, very briefly, as if it were on fire.

Credit to them at least for that.

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  • Drunk_by_Noon

    We have achieved “Quantum Charley” in that millions are simultaneously existing in the contradictory states of “Charlie” and “NOT Charlie”.

    • Yes we have reached Peak Charlie;)

    • tom_billesley

      Was Schrodinger’s cat named Charlie?

      • Xavier

        About half the time, yes.

        • Minicapt

          … otherwise, “Chuck”.

          Cheers

  • Censored_often

    Indeed, the United Kaliphate is a reality. Well done, Britain!

    On the other hand, will Farage’s political movement gain steam? I surely hope so!

    • tom_billesley

      A lot of people will vote UKIP without even bothering to read their manifesto, the lib/lab/con political establishment is so alienating.

  • tom_billesley

    o/t The big but …
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/15/pope-francis-limits-to-freedom-of-expression
    Pope Francis: there are limits to freedom of expression
    Pope Francis says there are limits to freedom of expression, especially when it insults or ridicules someone’s faith.

    Speaking on Thursday about the Paris attacks while en route to the Philippines, Francis defended freedom of expression as not only a fundamental human right but a duty to speak one’s mind for the sake of the common good.

    But he said there were limits.

    By way of example, he referred to Alberto Gasparri, who organises papal trips and was standing by his side. He said: “If my good friend Dr Gasparri says a curse word against my mother, he can expect a punch. It’s normal. It’s normal. You cannot provoke. You cannot insult the faith of others. You cannot make fun of the faith of others.”

  • Mal
  • Xavier

    Je Suis Dhimmi