Wildrose exec: Planned defection of MLAs ‘a betrayal’

The Wildrose Party isn’t finished, says one of their executives who called an apparent imminent mass defection to the Tories “a betrayal.”

Jeff Callaway said the party will fight on and choose an interim leader after he said its current head, Danielle Smith, is set to abandon the Wildrose for the governing PCs.

“It’s unfortunate judgement on her part, now we’ll be searching for a new leader,” said Callaway, the party’s vice-president of fundraising.

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  • The Goat

    Maybe she can do for the PCs what she did to Wildrose. Here’s hoping.

    • Lloyd Snauwaert

      I liked Danielle and am very disappointed at this betrayal…

      • Sean

        You can’t be surprised at this after her throw in with the AGW crowd.

        • Lloyd Snauwaert

          I spoke with Danielle about her wavering position on AGW and told her the warmists were imploding under the weight of their own lies. I’m not sure it registered…

          • Sean

            She has exhibited nothing throughout her tenure that made me think she was any different from the Redfraud crowd…. except that she looks good in front of a camera. If only Sheila Taylor had gotten elected…

          • Lloyd Snauwaert

            Things would probably be very different today had Wildrose won that by-election. Which raises the question…Why was there not more resources poured into winning that one riding?

          • Sean

            I’m not real sure things would be much different. They would have only gone 1-3 instead of 0-4 in the byelections. I only wanted Sheila Taylor for some eye candy.

          • Lloyd Snauwaert

            Ha! WR only had a realistic shot at winning in the one riding, moot point now…

          • ntt1

            AGW is seen as nothing more that a wonderfull imaginary hook to hang an entire generation of new deep taxation on the productive.Do any politicians believe in it? no . but they do believe in using it as a tax grab.

  • Linda1000

    So now Alberta has no official opposition party (not that Wildrose was strong as an alternative) but I don’t see how that can be good for the province with the PC monopoly being unaccountable. Alberta is just like Ontario now with a one party gov’t.

    • Lloyd Snauwaert

      It seems there will be a half dozen WRP Mlas left and as such would remain official opposition. There is also a lot of money in the party bank account that will remain with the party. I must take issue with the effectiveness of the WRP as opposition. IMHO they were the best opposition we’ve had in at least 20 years, drove NDPer Allison Redford from office and forced the PCs back to the right.

      The divisions in the WRP between hardline socons and fiscal cons/libertarians was capitalized on by Prentice, effectively resulting in this borg like assimilation of the only real threat to the PC dynasty.

      All in all, a revolting turn of events…

      • Exile1981

        I’m thinking that if Wildrose can re-group voters who elected the ones who jumped ship will smack them down at the next election.

        • Lloyd Snauwaert

          I guess we’ll have to see who is left in the next few hours. Some floor crossers will likely be punished in what is likely to be a spring 15 election. The WRP is going to have a hard time regrouping completely in the next four or five months.

  • Sean

    I wish I wasn’t unelectable just so I could pull pins on grenades everytime Danielle or Anderson or Saskiw spoke…

  • Alain

    This reminds me of how the original Reform Party disappeared along with all it stood for. Very disappointing and sad to see.

    • Waffle

      Glad you brought that up. I was just thinking what short memories we all have. Cast your minds back to 2005 (?) when the Canadian Alliance “duked” it out with the PC’s to unite the fractured right. The relatively unknown Stephen Harper won the leadership role over the better-known Peter McKay. Hard to believe now, but Scott Brison was also a contender. He ultimately left the new CPC (Conservative Party of Canada) and showed his true colours as a Liberal which was a prediction made by one of the pundits at the time — i.e. that some of the Red Tories (left-leaning) would ultimately join the Liberals .
      Of course, none of this happened overnight — it happened in stages: first with Reform and then with Alliance. The CPC was a long time in coming to fruition.

      I keep asking myself how long it’s going to take for a sea change here in Ontario, ironically the part of Canada that keeps re-electing Stephen Harper (thank goodness) but utterly hopeless in making substantive changes within its so-called provincial conservative ranks. We seem almost apologetic in admitting that we are conservatives, if we even vote, provincially, that is.

      That was the problem (since people keep asking) — the so-called conservatives didn’t vote in the last Provincial, so a few low-infomation types, die-hards, and blood-sucking putlic sector union loyalists whose total numbers added up to a mere fraction of the eligible electoriate allowed this insufferable, depraved bitch and her criminal cohorts to raid the treasury and what is left in our pockets.

      Whoever said that people get the government they deserve was right.

  • ntt1

    there is a parallel to the stampede of BC Social Credit types into the shell party that the Liberals were back in the day, the Socreds took over and the liberals have been the main non neo marxist party ever since. Could this be a quiet take over? maybe the progressive conservstives are looking to dump the progressives and build a stronger small government party.?

    • Pete_Brewster

      No. The Wildrose MLAs who were serious about reform are staying put. The opportunists are crossing the floor.

      • ntt1

        most politicians are opportunists,

        • Alain

          I suspect it is more like 100% with some being more opportunist than others. This results in all our professional politicians who simply jump from one level to another: provincial to federal, federal to provincial, provincial to municipal and so on. There really needs to be term limits which would mean at the end of your turn, you are out of politics at any level. Since they all have a vested interest in maintaining the present system and their seat on the gravy train, I do not see it changing.

          • ntt1

            I would also like see lawyer’s kept out as well it is a huge conflict of interest, many union bosses would love to have the bar’s death grip on legislation ,implementation and judicial processes, At present we have growing antipathy for the whole rotten charade, no wonder turn-out is falling.

  • Pete_Brewster

    I hope whatever guarantees Jim Prentice made Danielle Smith were worth abandoning the pretense of democracy in Alberta.

    I’ve wondered since the rigged provincial election whether Smith was in on the joke.