Never happy: Coca Cola withdrew these sexist ads but why were they made in the first place?

Coca Cola and Fairlife have come under fire for a series of sexist adverts for a new premium brand of milk…

…The adverts objectify women’s bodies in a manner so obvious and gratuitous it is both offensive and insulting. These images take us back to days where women’s bodies were paraded around as objects used to sell products, with the implication being the women are for sale themselves.

The way in which these ads objectify and commodify women’s bodies removes all agency from the women themselves. The slogan “drink what she’s wearing” implies the woman’s body, and her clothes, serve the sole purpose of pleasing the consumer (to say nothing of the fact that it disregards the distinct possibility that the women would like to continue wearing what she’s wearing, and not have it removed by the drinker)…

…As Laura Bates writes, this campaign makes it obvious some sections of the advertising and corporate worlds are sliding backwards when it comes to sexism. On the other hand, the voice of the public on social media is definitely pulling forwards and holding people to account. The critical question is, who will end up winning this tug of war?

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  • RevnantDream

    They where made because men like lovely Women & the Ladies like to compare

  • Norman_In_New_York

    They were made because hetero sex appeal sells products whether the protesting dikes like it or not.

  • AlanUK

    The cartoons are no worse than dozens of “celebrities” who (in their version of real life) wear less and reveal more on the red carpet, in the social media and other internet sites.

  • minuteman

    I bet Laura Bates is fat and ugly.

  • DaninVan

    Don’t care; I (really!) like the redhead.

  • ntt1

    Hell of a time for lactose intolerance to rear its ugly head.

    • Blacksmith

      It would be worth it…….

  • Minicapt

    According to the web-page, Julia Gillard will be joining them to broaden their women’s outlooks. It does appear to be a lair for Tim Blair’s ‘frightbats’.

    Cheers