Can Marijuana Fuel Jihad?

Photo: Michael Zehaf-Bibeau

Potheads defend their addiction by insisting that marijuana can make people lazy, dumb or hungry, but not violent. However, the case of Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, the Canadian Islamic terrorist killer, proves otherwise.

Zehaf-Bibeau was an Islamist, as well as a pothead. In another notorious case of jihad, one of the Boston Marathon bombers, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was not only a dope smoker but a dealer.

It appears that Dzhokhar’s brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev was implicated in a Jewish triple murder case in which thousands of dollars’ worth of marijuana and money were left covering the bodies. All three victims’ throats were slashed.

It may be too early to draw a direct connection between jihad, marijuana, and mass murder, but it is worth considering whether consumption of the drug can alter the mind to such an extent that jihad becomes appealing to some mentally unstable individuals…

The word ‘assassin’ derives from Arabic but Wikipedia says the connection with ‘hashish’ is not direct:

The Assassins (from Arabic: حشّاشين‎ Ḥashshāshīn) were an order of Nizari Ismailis, particularly those of Persia and Syria, that formed in the late 11th century. In time, the order began to pose a strong military threat to Sunni Seljuq authority within the Persian territories by capturing and inhabiting many mountain fortresses under the leadership of Hassan-i Sabbah.

The name “Assassin” is often said to derive from the Arabic Hashishin or “users of hashish”, thought to have been originally derogatory and used by their adversaries during the Middle Ages.

In actuality, the word is a misnomer for the Nizari Ismailis applied abusively to them by the Mustali Ismailis during the fall of the decaying Ismaili Fatimid Empire when the two streams separated from each other. In 1122 the Mustalian dynasty Fatimid caliph al-Amir referred to the Nizaris as the hashishiyya “without any explanation” and “without actually accusing them of using hashish, a product of hemp”.

The term hashishiyya or hashishi as used by Muslim sources is used metaphorically in its abusive sense (i.e. “social outcasts”, “low-class rabble”, etc.), while the literal interpretation of this term in referring to the Nizaris (as hashish consuming intoxicated assassins) is rooted in the fantasies of medieval Westerners.

Share