Stranger than fiction: Muslim Brotherhood, Jamaat-e-Islami and global jihad (parts 2 and 3)

From Part 2, about the Muslim Brotherhood:

The MB is very different from other political parties. One just cannot become a member without going through a five/eight-year stringent indoctrination process to prove one’s loyalty and commitment to its ideology.

Very similar to the Jamaat-e-Islami, the MB believes in gradual infiltration of its ideology among the masses and portrays itself a believer in democracy.

During the anti-Mubarak movement in Egypt, “far from emulating Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, they [MB leaders] channeled Thomas Paine, calling for civil liberties, religious equality, and an end to Mubarak’s dictatorship.”

In other word, lying.

From Part 3, about Jamaat-e-Islami, which is huge in Asia but gets little attention in the MSM:

Maulana Abul Ala Maududi (1903-1979), an Indian-born madrassah-educated journalist, author and political thinker was the founder of the Jamaat-e-Islami or Party of Islam. It came into being in 1941 in British India. Maududi started the organisation with a view to promoting Islamic values and practices in the light of his way of interpreting the Quran and hadis. He was a maverick. His ideas were quite radical and different from the mainstream Sunni ulama or clerics in the Indian Subcontinent.
[…]
We find ideological similarities between the MB and JI. Like Qutb, Maududi also strove for God’s sovereignty. Maududi, however, came up with a new theory of democracy. It was “theo-democracy” or a theocracy run in a democratic manner. He also wanted to establish a caliphate to run the “Islamic system of governance.” In his “theo-democratic” caliphate, minority non-Muslims would remain as zimmis* or protected people with inferior rights.

*Zimmis = dhimmis (the Arabic “dh” sound seems to have come across as “z” in the subcontinent. One also sees Ramadan written as Ramazan.)

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