wynne plug ugly

Woman who ran Ontario’s first anti-racism office ‘not enamoured’ of Wynne’s ‘knee-jerk’ plan to revive it

The woman who ran Ontario’s since-shuttered anti-racism secretariat two decades ago is today unconvinced the province needs to reopen the office under a different name.

  • JohnfromToronto

    Let’s assume that this government is doing what governments are supposed to do in a competent manner. Even then this would be a bad idea and a waste of money.

    • At the very least. It’s vote whoring plain and simple.

      • tom_billesley

        Will Wynne by changing the name to reflect the need to succour the race of islam?

  • eMan14

    Just another layer of government bureaucracy to silence dissent.

  • Lemme see, the civil rights movement was in the ’60’s when I was a teenager and everybody got along fine after that (I know, because I went to work in the States for a couple years — it was irrelevant to Canada because we never had segregation or slavery). That was more than five decades ago. In the interim I went overseas, raised a family in a different culture (of brown and black people), returned to Canada and now I have grandchildren and I’m approaching retirement. And suddenly there’s more talk of racism in Canada than I ever heard in the States back in the ’60’s. We even have a “Black History” month.

    What Black history?!! The only significant population of Blacks in Canada are recent immigrants from the West Indies and Africa who are mostly first generation — we haven’t even given them a chance to be here long enough to do anything historically significant. And “racism” is apparently so rampant here, that it’s worse than in the U.S. before the Civil rights movement although we’ve never had segregation or slavery. Canada has always gone out of its way to make immigrants feel welcome — that’s our history!

    These morons want to make us feel guilty for a racist past that we have never had, hence creating the conditions for actual racial conflict. Believe me I feel like punching Wynne in the head. And it would not be “violence against women” or “violence against Gays”; it would be violence against a fascist politician who I want to treat equally as she were like any other fascist politician who deserves to be tarred and feathered and ridden on a rail and driven out of town.

    • Shebel

      WOW ! . And here I was starting to feel lonely.

    • Waffle

      Back in 1992 I went to live in Texas. Toronto friends and relatives cluck-clucked shook their heads and whined “But they’re so racist down there!”

      Well, it didn’t take long before I realized that my Toronto friends were much more race-obsessed than the Texans I met (multi-coloured) would ever be.

      Curious about race relations, I had a talk with a business associate who lives in a mostly white East Texas city. He was a teenager when the schools were integrated so I asked him what it was like. He told me that the day the buses arrived, everybody came out to get a good look at the new talent for the football team. BTW, hockey games now compete with the Friday night football games, thanks to the influx of Canadians (since the 1970’s) quietly living the good life in the deep south.

      I have come to the conclusion that racism in Canada is more rhetoric than reality. fueling an artificial industry.

      (as a side note, my first black friend was one of the ring-leaders of the Sir George computer trashing);)

      • Good story (although I had to look up the Sir George computer trashing).

        I lived and worked in the southwest — California, Arizona and New Mexico. And travelled the rest of the South — Louisiana being one of my favourite places.

        Anyway what you say is true. I think Americans are more relaxed in mixed-race company than Canadians — lets face it they’ve been living, loving, and fighting together for a couple centuries before Canadians had that experience.

        You can even detect it on TV when mixed-races are working together on a live show — they seem totally relaxed. Compare that to the CBC. I’m thinking of the George Stromboalphabet show. He was always inviting black celebrities from the US and everything was so politically-correct and on pins and needles. Strombo would focus on race and asking them about racism. More than once the black US guest would give him a curious look like “why do you keep asking me about racism and my blackness, what about my career and life apart from that?” On a number of occasions I noticed his guests trying to steer the conversation in another direction, but good ol’ Georgy would steer them back.

        • Waffle

          So true. If you’ve ever been to the Beach Jazz Festival you can really see those differences in action. American blacks are totally self-confident.

          Footnote to my story: My friend was 2nd generation (born in Canada — her parents came from the Islands). She told me later she became radicalized when MLK was assassinated. I don’t think that racism was ever a problem either for her or her siblings. In fact, her older sister was McGill’s first black winter carnival queen. Way later, I happened to meet Senator Cools who was also one of the ring leaders. I did not know her, but I knew 2 of the others. When we were introduced, I joked “Finally, I get to meet you! I knew your partners in crime!” She hugged and kissed me like a long-lost sister and invited me to visit.

          • In ’71 when I moved there seemed pretty mellow in the U.S. re: race relations (when I said ’60’s I meant the more loosely defined Viet Nam/counter-culture decade ’64-’74). And of course ’71 was after MLK. But there were exceptions.

            Black Panthers, for example, I found to be quite dangerous and racist when I had a run in with them in California. These guys were killers and I was lucky to get out alive in a situation when they pulled a weapon on me. I was also introduced to members of the Nation of Islam who were intimidating from the get-go. But I got out of there fast that time so there was no incident.

            Apart from those two brief experiences with the militant groups I don’t remember anything that looked like racism, either on the part of blacks or whites. Same goes with Mexican-Americans who were likewise laid-back.

    • Minicapt

      1795, Gov Simcoe tabled legislation to eliminate slavery in Upper Canada. The business interests fought against it but it was only amended such that no children could forthwith be born into slavery, those under the age of 16 were to be released, by their 16th birthday (with some education), and all adult to be manumitted within 25 years, or before 1820.
      I think Lower Canada had laws forbidding active recaptures of escaped slaves, but legislation forbidding all slavery may not have been written till after 1820.
      There was some slavery in Nova Scotia before 1775, but it quickly disappeared. Until the arrival of the West Indies Immigrants to Toronto, the oldest group of Canadian Negros were the descendants of freed slaves transported from New York and New England in 1783. After them were the Underground Railway escapees who settled in the Windsor-Chatham area.


      • Thanks.
        I think the English abolished slavery before the other colonial powers, so any remnants of slavery in pre-Confederation Canada disappeared rather early. It wasn’t so much a part of Canadian history since it was English slavery and their history. Of course the freed slaves and escapees from the U.S. we’ve always recognized and celebrated. I was thinking in terms of population they weren’t very large and didn’t proliferate much over the years. Black History month was imported from the US representing a much larger demography and a totally different historical dynamic, somewhat opposite to ours. IMO.

        • Minicapt

          It took the Brits about 20 years to complete the process, starting with the first anti-Slave Trade legislation in 1807 and finishing with the Slavery Abolition Act in 1833. A major stumbling block was the slave’s actual value to the owner, this required legislation by which the government compensated the owners for their soon-to-be losses.


        • tom_billesley

          Canada had a lack of plantations.

  • Shebel

    The fact that Justin is enamoured by this crazed bitch — sorta leaves ..
    Canada–overly exposed.

  • David Murrell

    There is a good chapter in the book “Rae Days”, by left-wing writer Thomas Walkom, then with the left-wing Globe and MaIl. The chapter dealt with the anti-racism office back then, which was charged with forcing private companies with 50 or more employees with devoloping “affirnative action hiring plans”. What was hilarious was that, within the anti-racism office, each gender/race/sexual orientation faction hated each other (e.g. the blacks hated the lesbians, etc.) . Needless to say the enire department collapsed into comic incompetence.

  • reidjr

    Was this not the office that more or less had a pro black agenda.