Justin Trudeau Muslim Convert Traitor

Trudeau’s first move doesn’t bode well

Justin Trudeau’s first move as prime minister is to take Canada out of the fight against the Islamic State.

We will no longer be fighting the terrorist group that burns people alive in cages, is partially responsible for the refugee crisis, and has identified Canada as a target for attacks.

While the incoming prime minister has the authority to pull Canada out of the mission right away, it’s poor optics to do so for a number of reasons.

  • simus1

    Shiny Pony could hardly show up for Friday prayers without somehow showing he’s getting the ball rolling.

    • True at least now he won’t be beheaded.

      • dance…dancetotheradio


  • Denis

    we, Canadians, are soooo screwed. Especially in the west!

  • Jaedo Drax

    Brave Sir Justin ran away
    Bravely ran away away
    (I didn’t!)
    When danger reared its ugly head
    He bravely turned his tail and fled

    Yes, brave Sir Justin turned about
    (I didn’t!)
    And gallantly he chickened out
    Bravely taking to his feet
    (I never did!)
    He beat a very brave retreat
    (All lies!)
    Bravest of the brave, Sir Justin!
    (I never!)

    Read more: Monty Python – Brave Sir Robin Ran Away Lyrics | MetroLyrics

  • Waffle

    I’m shocked — yes, really shocked. I recall an interview a couple of weeks ago when he said the very first thing he would do was to call all the premiers and have a confab on climate change.

    Aside from the premature ejaculation of our fighter jets, he has promised — got to keep his word, ya know — to flood us with 25,000 Syrian “refugees” before New Year’s Day rings in. I also seem to recall his love and admiration for China’s ‘basic dictatorship’. So, how’s he going to make this happen? Will he wave his little magic wand and all will fall into place? Will he take a leaf out of Angela’s little book and toss seniors and disabled folks out of their subsidized apartments? Stay tuned folks. This is going to get very interesting.

    But I’m outta here — anybody want a cat?

    • Been planning to get out for more than a year now. Got rid of most possessions except the necessary — whittled everything down to fit in one large steamer trunk. Anybody want to rent space to store the trunk at a reasonable price (say about $5 a month — $60/year up front)? Roughly 3.5 x 2 x 2 feet — easily fits in a cubby hole somewhere.

      Wish I could help you with your cat, but where I’m going they probably cook them for lunch. 😉 Actually you can probably let it loose to roam my building and some kind soul will adopt it.

      • David

        So where ya’ll goin?

      • Waffle

        So you saw the writing on the wall awhile ago? Smart. I’m working on a home for the cat. I can’t just toss him out and leave him to his fate — he’s so nice (even though he drives me crazy sometimes). I’m planning to sell or give away my stuff and ideally make arrangements to transport by vehicle the stuff I’d like to take with me.

        Everybody asks, “But what about your OHIP?” #1 question — I’ve been picking up some feedback on FB and I know from my own experience, it’s going downhill really fast, so that’s one less tether I need be concerned about.

        • I spent about half my adult life living abroad — OHIP and other benefits weren’t a problem so long as I paid taxes in Canada. Although OHIP won’t cover you while abroad (maybe a few minor claims when you file taxes) but at least you’re covered when you visit.

          • Waffle

            I think things have changed. I’ll be applying for a Permanent Resident visa under which I’ll be covered, however I don’t think it will kick in for about a year so I’ll probably have to buy private insurance. Am doing my due diligence now to find out about all this stuff. Place I’m going is pretty well a retirement village so a lot of people have the same health concerns as I do.

          • Some things have changed — I had private, public, plus OHIP (employer paid for private). But the Left in Canada is making it difficult for retirees even abroad. They think all of us are millionaire tax evaders (except for real millionaires like Justin — it’s okay if he uses tax shelters!).

            In my case I’ll be poor as a church mouse if I retire in Canada, whereas abroad I can live relatively comfortably. But it will still take all my smarts to make it work. No way I can afford a retirement village — probably looking at something rural and melt into the culture. Already “been there and done that” so it’s not difficult in theory, my only concern is the current law and order situation. Apparently worse than when I was last there during a civil war!

            So, first thing on the agenda is a “recon” trip. If I find something I like, then it’s “bye-bye Canada” for good.

          • Waffle

            I probably gave you the wrong impression — lots of retirees there but also expats of all ages. My rent and expenses will basically be half of what it’s costing me now. One can live there entirely in English, but it would be nice to learn Spanish. If you’re interested, I can forward info through BCF.

          • Of course — the more info the better. Thank you (by this writing Cat has permission to give you my e-mail). Actually I can live there for about one quarter the cost — I’m bilingual in Spanish and lots of experience in Latin America. But lots of things have changed for the worse. Ideally I’d like to set up a small business or get property.

          • Waffle

            Thanks — will send later, am running right now — have to get to bank before it closes.

  • Raymond Hietapakka

    Doesn’t want to kill off any future Liberal voters…