epa04681504 US Secretary of State John Kerry (L) and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (R) at the start of talks on Iran's nuclear programme, in Lausanne, Switzerland, 27 March 2015. The chief diplomats of the United States and Iran launched a final stretch of talks to hammer out key elements of a wide-ranging nuclear deal that could mend Tehran's relations with the West.  EPA/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / POOL

The Iran Deal is Not Verifiable Now or Later

With 51 days left in the period for Congressional consideration of the Iran deal, the respected Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS) has released a report on “Verification of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action,” which concludes there are weaknesses that “must be remediated or compensated for if the agreement is to be verifiable,” and that “without stringent long-term limits on Iran’s sensitive nuclear programs … these verification conditions … are unlikely to be sufficient.” ISIS concludes that – if the remediation or compensation occurs – the verification provisions will likely be adequate during the first 10-15 years of the agreement, “but will be inadequate afterwards if Iran implements its plan to expand its centrifuge program and possibly start a reprocessing program.” In other words, the agreement as it stands is unverifiable without additional steps; and after it sunsets, the verification provisions will be inadequate.